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Found 14 results

  1. Elaine Bien

    New IoT Devices Made in Ukraine

    I suppose this article might be interesting for this IoT community. It dwells upon major smart devices that have been invented and brought to life recently. For example, well-known device Cardiomo that allows monitoring heart and breath rate due to a small patch, or the one that has just appeared on Kickstarter - SolarGaps, smart window blinds able to accumulate solar energy and even save it to sell to your electricity provider. The one that is the craziest (to my mind) is Luciding, a way to lucid dreams. You have to wear it and during REM stage it'll "wake up" your brain to make your spleeping conscious I don't know why people need it, but it's fun how science is developing and what opportunities it brings. Here is the very article: https://qubit-labs.com/striking-iot-smart-devices-made-ukraine/
  2. Andrew at MEA

    Smart Passive Sensors

    ON Semiconductor have introduced a range of IoT wireless sensors for measuring temperature, moisture, pressure and proximity that are battery-free and microcontroller-free—using standard protocols. https://www.allaboutcircuits.com/industry-articles/the-rundown-of-on-semiconductors-smart-passive-sensors-sps-for-the-iot/
  3. Casino hacked via a thermometer in a lobby aquarium – what a nice story. Sad, there is no technical details in the article. http://www.businessinsider.de/hackers-stole-a-casinos-database-through-a-thermometer-in-the-lobby-fish-tank-2018-4?r=UK&IR=T
  4. Nadine Cranenburgh

    Incarceration with IoT

    Introduction Replacing prisons with high tech systems capable of detaining prisoners in their own homes and the use of artificial intelligence to predict and prevent imminent offenses may sound the stuff of science fiction, but rapid advances in technology surrounding IoT makes such a vision a possibility worth discussing. A system that effectively turns prisoners into internet nodes using IoT wearables with the ability to deliver electric shocks would have significant social impact. These ramifications need to be taken into account along with engineering design and legal considerations. This application of IoT falls at the intersection of engineering, technology and law, and as such, needs an interdisciplinary approach. The case for technological incarceration Big data, IoT, and AI can be useful in reforming and improving certain aspects of the legal system. One candidate is the prison system, which has remained largely unchanged for hundreds of years. In Australia and many other Western countries, the rate of incarceration is increasing as governments respond to voter pressure to be tough on crime. This comes at a high social and financial cost. In the US, the cost of running prisons is tens of billions of dollars per year. In Australia the annual cost is in the billions. It would actually be cheaper (although not practical) to assign an individual police officer to each prisoner. For prisoners, incarceration causes effects following release including diminished life expectancy, prolonged unemployment and reduced income. This leads to further costs to the public purse. In addition, a disproportionate number of underprivileged and minority groups are imprisoned, including Indigenous Australians and African Americans. One of the main arguments for incarceration is to deter people from committing crimes. Research has shown that a more effective deterrent than fear of prison is the belief by a potential criminal that their crime is likely to be detected, and that prisoners with a harsh sentence reoffend at a marginally higher rate than those dealt with leniently. Protection of the community through incarceration of violent criminals is also limited to the length of sentences. How could technological incarceration work? Technological incarceration has the potential to punish criminals and keep the community safe while reducing the financial and social costs of traditional incarceration. One proposal is to implement a variant of home detention which uses electronic bracelets or anklets along with an IoT system to achieve: real-time tracking of offenders’ locations constant surveillance of offenders’ actions immediate immobilisation of offenders who are committing a crime or escaping Challenges One challenge of technological incarceration is that GPS tracking with wearables is not an adequate substitute for prison because it cannot prevent offenders from harming others in their location or if they escape. To solve this issues, the wearables need to be able to report to a central location in real-time. For constant surveillance, and prevention of harm to the public, the cost of corrections officers viewing CCTV for every offender is too expensive. Therefore a computer-monitoring solution needs to be found. The final challenge is how to immobilise offenders who are reoffending or escaping. This could be achieved by incorporating a device such as a taser into the offender’s anklet, which could be remotely activated if incapacitation was required. Technological incarceration could be perceived as “soft” by the community, and education might be needed to convince the public that deprivation of liberty is a harsh punishment in itself. Conversely, some may see it as too harsh, due to complete loss of privacy and the risks of tasering. It could be argued that these concerns are not as great as the current ramifications of traditional incarceration. Technological incarceration would also place a burden on families, be vulnerable to technological failure, and present privacy concerns to family members and engineers and technicians involved in maintenance of the incarceration equipment. An important question is the number of technology triggered taser-related deaths, or failures of tasers leading to public danger that society is willing to tolerate, similar to the issues of driverless vehicle-caused fatalities and casualties. This needs to be put in context with current issues including deaths and violent attacks in prisons, and crimes committed by offenders on bail. Another question is whether technological incarceration would be made available to every offender, or only those who are not violent or dangerous. As the offenders would be imprisoned in their own homes, provisions would also have to be made for accommodation for homeless offenders. Technology The electronic anklet is existing technology. There are two forms: one uses RF tracking capability and the other GPS. The GPS version has the capability to accurately track offenders to within around 10 centimeters. They are fitted with an alarm for tampering, and cost around a sixth to a tenth of traditional imprisonment. In existing devices, fibre optic technology is used to provide tamper-proofing: a beam is interrupted when offenders try to remove their device. However, this technology is only used currently for offenders on parole or with a non-custodial sentence. To solve the more complex problem of monitoring and incapacitating offenders in real time if they are posing a danger to others, proponents of technological incarceration have proposed the use of sensor vests in conjunction with computer-based monitoring with technologies such as machine vision. Rather than installing fixed sensors (infrared temperature sensors (IRT), audio sensors and cameras) in offenders’ homes, these sensors could be installed in modified police vests. This has already been trialled with cameras in vests to provide police accountability. Machine vision has the potential to detect suspicious movements such as fast hand and leg movement, or picking up implements.There is also a lot of promise in using sensors and machine vision interpretation with convolutional neural networks (ConvNets or CNNs) which have proven effective in image recognition and classification in driverless cars and robot vision. One issue is the transmission of sensor data (particularly high definition video) in real time for analysis. This could be resolved by analysing the data locally on the vest, and transmitting interpretations, however, it is yet to be determined if available interpretation technology is small enough to be mobile. Another area for further investigation is how integrated audio, visual and other sensor data can be used to gain a picture of the offender's activities than high definition video alone. Biosensors (which are used in the monitoring of athlete’s condition) could also be used to monitor offenders’ emotional state. Stable communications are also necessary for the transmission of real time data and triggering of tasers. This would require a reliable 4G, or preferably signal in the offender’s home. If the data connection is lost, police officers would need to be called in. This is another argument for only using technological incarceration for lower risk offenders. Low battery charge levels on the tasering device would also trigger a police visit. Facial recognition technology also has the potential to allow monitoring of the gradual reintegration of offenders into society after their sentence has been served. Progress Technological incarceration using IoT systems is feasible, but its implementation is limited by social and legal concerns and challenges. Once these challenges and concerns have been addressed, it might be possible to trial technological incarceration on less dangerous offenders (elderly, female and white collar) in controlled conditions. If society does go down the path of technological incarceration, it is unlikely that people would be completely removed from offender management. In the case of a suspicious movement, an alarm could alert corrections officers and provide them with a visual feed to make a decision on the appropriate response. Once the technology has been proven, it might be possible to hand over more control of the response to the AI system, in a similar way that we are now allowing driverless cars to make judgement calls on the road. The manufacturing and supply of devices that could be used in technological incarceration is primarily based in the US at the moment, but there is potential for it to expand to Australia and other nations if society accepts its implementation. Sources: The content on this page was primarily derived from the following: Webinar titled “The Internet of Incarceration” by Professor Dan Hunter, Dean, Swinburne Law School
  5. Nadine Cranenburgh

    Smart Metering of Utilities

    Introduction Smart metering using IoT has the potential to increase efficient use of utilities and identify and resolve issues in supply infrastructure in the utility industry. One definition of smart metering is the collection of metering data on utility (electricity, water, gas) use, and the systems and processes that derive value from the data. It also enables two-way communications from the meter to utility providers and users, and involves intelligence and processing within the meter that differentiates it from simple automated meter-reading systems that send a reading at specified intervals. Smart metering is widely used in the electrical power industry, due to ready availability of power for IoT devices, however has proved more challenging in metering other utilities such as water. Smart meters enable users and suppliers to gain insights into the utility use of a particular site, piece of equipment, house: anything with a meter. It also gives electricity distribution or water network operators insights into the operation of the network. On the supply end of the meter, utility providers can start to understand what demand is on the network, and when and where there is demand. Smart metering solutions have the following key focus areas: sustainability: reducing the amount of resources that we consume and the energy required to treat or distribute the resource increasing labour efficiency (eg. installing a sensor rather than having a person check manually) increasing economic efficiency As with any IoT project, the cost of smart metering solutions needs to be offset by efficiency or cost savings driven by value extracted from the data collected. One key to increasing efficiency with smart metering is to provide customer friendly data visualisation, interactive analytics and data sharing to allow users to monitor and modify their utility usage. This may not be necessary for corporate users, who will require integration of smart metering data with their own business systems to drive economic and operational benefits. Enrichment of data with additional sources (such as weather and home automation data) also adds value, as does automating processes and work flows by feeding smart metering data or summaries into scheduling, reporting and service systems. Monitoring water use can also businesses predict future utility use for more informed financial planning. Smart metering of water The water industry has historically lacked economically IoT solutions for smart metering. Only around one percent of residential water meters (95% of the water market) are smart enabled. However the application of IoT technologies to high water users is now delivering significant results. Low cost, high volume remote sensing devices are using new low power wide area network (LPWAN) communication technologies and advanced data analytics to develop new business models for the management of water use. Users are more easily able to identify water leaks and consumption trends, to generate insights and facilitate smarter action. The key components of IoT in the water industry are similar to other vertical IoT solutions: · physical layer: low cost, low power remote sensors and devices · network layer: LPWAN, other connectivity · Cloud and edge computing · Data storage, analytics, machine learning · Integration with operational and business systems These components and their relation to each other are shown in the diagram below. Diagram courtesy of Rian Sullings, WaterGroup Pty Ltd Machine learning is used to improve the efficiency data analysis, especially for large data sets for cities rather than individual buildings. Integration of smart water metering systems with operational and business systems is a developing area, as historically they have been stand alone systems rolled out by water utilities with links to billing and some data analytics. Future developments are likely to include data connections to systems that schedule maintenance work, and automatic alerts to operators to resolve detected water leaks. Smart water meters distinguish baseflow (constant, steady flow) from leaks (steady or slightly fluctuating use of water which varies from the norm). Data analysis can inform other efficiencies including timing of air conditioning operation to maximise efficient use of cooling towers. Leak detection provides the greatest economic benefit of smart water metering. A recent project delivered water savings that covered the cost of smart meter installation in less than a year. The diagram below shows the increase in water usage (dark blue line) caused by a leak in the roof sprinklers during the new year’s break at a facility. An automatic alert sent by the smart metering system allowed the leak to be detected and fixed in a matter of days. Diagram courtesy of Rian Sullings, WaterGroup Pty Ltd Challenges Challenges to IoT smart metering solutions can be industry specific. For example, the water industry has infrastructure, such as underground pipes and meters, that are very difficult to access and successfully establish data communications with. This has historically made implementation of IoT and other electronic solutions (end-to-end telematics, SCADA) solutions challenging, as they require deployment of devices with access to power and communications channels. Prototypes are being developed for Sigfox smart metering devices outside North America and Europe, as the frequencies vary between regions, and smart metering devices have not been widely used outside these areas. There is also a limited amount of knowledge of developing smart metering applications for IoT, particularly in the water industry, so collaboration with professional organisations and between developers is important. Another challenge is educating utility users that installing a smart metering system will not increase sustainable resource use unless there are clearly defined goals and methods to store, analyse and feed data into decision making to change behaviour to maximise efficiency. To do this, smart metering systems need to be integrated with business or operational systems, which can be challenging as some utilities (eg. water), currently have limited standards to aid integration of IoT data. Security of smart metering systems is also a concern, particularly for government run systems. This can result in private servers being set up rather than hosting smart metering data in the cloud. Data ownership and privacy are also challenging, particularly for sharing of data collected from private homes. Suppliers and Innovators Australian smart metering company WaterGroup has formed a partnership with IoT communications provider Thinxstra to use the Sigfox LPWAN to allow high water users to detect leaks, and has received an award from the Australian communications industry for positive application of IoT technologies. Over the past few years, South East Water (SEW) in Victoria have been trialling a range of different Internet of Things (IOT) technologies with the goal of creating the most advanced water and waste water network in Australia. The trials are aimed at identifying an IOT platform that will allow the connection of around one million monitoring and controlling devices across SEW’s water and wastewater network using a low power wide area network. More information is contained in the case study page for this project. Standards The Australian national data standard standard for energy smart metering is NEM-12, administered by the Australian Energy Market Operator (AEMO). Standards for IoT-based smart metering of water are still being developed. There is no standard format data storage and transfer, so there are many different file types and formats, which are difficult to integrate. Middleware software can be used to convert data into a common format for integration. Other areas for development in IoT smart water metering data standards include reliability, communications protocols and security. IoT smart metering applications in Australia also use the Hypercat standard for cataloguing and storing IoT data. Sources The content in this page has been primarily sourced from: Webinar titled ‘Smart Metering for Water with the Internet of Things’ by Rian Sullings, Manager Smart Metering & IoT, WaterGroup Pty Ltd Further information Discussion of audience questions from Webinar titled ‘Smart Metering for Water with the Internet of Things’ by Rian Sullings, Manager Smart Metering & IoT, WaterGroup Pty Ltd
  6. Heath

    Newcastle IoT Pioneers

    until
    October: The Australian Maker Movement and its IoT Impact Our October event is on, usual time, usual place: 6:30pm, Thursday, October 5th, 2017. Stag & Hunter Hotel, Mayfield. Upstairs function room - look for the staircase in the middle of the pub. The Maker Movement is worldwide phenomenon that has put the creative and technical tools, once reserved for professionals, into the hands of amateurs and enthusiasts. And the results have been spectacular - inventions, businesses, creations of every scale have sprouted from the hands of the self-motivated and the curious. The accessibility of tools and technology has in no small part, driven the rapid adoption of the Internet of Things. And a significant part of that accessibility is thanks to the incredible devotion of our very own Newcastle based electronics shop, Core Electronics. I'm delighted to welcome the founder and managing director at Core Electronics, Graham Mitchell, as guest presenter this month. Graham is a tireless contributor to the maker movement, and will share a little about his story and the Australian maker movement in general. As usual, outside the main event there will be a news recap, plus plenty of opportunity to talk business and tech with like-minded folk from the local area. Feel free to bring up a drink from the bar downstairs or even order a meal from the restaurant, plus there'll be free finger food after the talks. All are welcome, but please RSVP so we can get the catering right.
  7. Nadine Cranenburgh

    Semantic Sensor Networks

    Introduction A very important technology in the sensor discovery area, introduced in 2013, is semantic sensor networks (SSN). Describing sensors and their data in a consistent and common framework makes it easier to discover them. This particular semantic system network description was developed by a consortium of organisations around the world called the W3C. The W3C is also working with the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) to develop clarify and formalise the standards landscape for spatial information on the web. SSN is an ontology that describes aspects of the sensors and the systems using them. It describes the deployment, the data, the system, the operating restrictions, the devices, the measuring capability, and the constraints of the sensors. The SSN can be focussed on: a sensor perspective: what is sensed, how it is sensed a data or observation perspective: observations and related metadata a system perspective: systems of sensors a feature and property perspective: features, properties of features and what can sense them. The SSN ontology can be downloaded from the W3C website. It has been used to annotate semantic web open-link data technologies, and can be queried using tools such as SPARQL. SSN is used extensively around the world, especially in Europe, and is the de-facto standard in this area today. Paradigm shift SSN represents a paradigm shift from the hard-coded vertical approach of referencing sensors by name or number to discovering sensors based on a description of the sensor, the sensor platform or the information it can provide, as shown in the diagram below. Diagram courtesy of Prem Prakash Jayaraman, Swinburne University of Technology Ontology modules The SSN consists of several ontology modules as shown in the diagram below. Diagram courtesy of Prem Prakash Jayaraman, Swinburne University of Technology These modules provide the ability to describe sensing platforms, sensors, and capabilities at a minute level. The sensor is described using an HTTP URI. For example, a sensor could be an air temperature sensor which was made by a particular manufacturer. It could observe air temperature and humidity. The unit of measurement of this observation could be Celsius or Fahrenheit. Any machine can look at this URI, get a description of the sensor, and be able to understand exactly what the sensor produces, how it produces this information, and from where the data is coming from. Other entries in the sensor description could include accuracy, location, owner and frequency of measurement. An example is shown in the diagram below. System developers can develop queries using properties and features that are relevant to their solution. Diagram courtesy of Prem Prakash Jayaraman, Swinburne University of Technology Sources The information on this page has been sourced primarily from the following: A webinar titled IoT application development with open data-driven computing platforms by Prof Dimitrios Georgakopoulos, Swinburne University of Technology A webinar titled An Open Source approach to the Internet of Things by Prem Prakash Jayaraman, Research Fellow, Key Lab for IOT, Swinburne University of Technology
  8. Bluetooth announced a big upgrade aiming to raise its game to be the one and only wireless standard to connect all the smart devices in your home. After releasing today the specification for Bluetooth Mesh, Bluetooth is making a good case for itself. It is pretty much exactly what it sounds like: it allows low-power Bluetooth devices to create and act like a mesh network. If you’re not familiar with mesh networking, here’s what it means: most wireless communications go straight from one point to another - say, from your router to your laptop and back again. If your laptop is too far out of range, then you’re just out of luck. Official announcement: https://blog.bluetooth.com/introducing-bluetooth-mesh-networking
  9. Imagine visiting your cardiologist and rather than being attached to a clunky machine to do an electrocardiogram test, the doctor just sprays on a conductive wearable mesh that can track your heart for a week. That's one possibility based on this new conductive mesh technology that researchers at the University of Tokyo have built. Full article: https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2017-07/uot-bwe071217.php
  10. Microsoft said we’d find Cortana in more places going forward and last week it announced a second IoT device, known as GLAS, made by a Johnson Controls. The company is well known for making HVAC equipment and controllers, and are the makers of the first electric room thermostat. It appears that GLAS will include a translucent touchscreen display that will allow owners to alter room temperatures, check energy usage and air quality, and see calendar information. More details on https://www.theverge.com/2017/7/19/16000474/microsoft-cortana-thermostat-johnson-controls-glas
  11. Australian startup Matter has announced an intelligent energy meter named 'Faraday'. It is a Power Line Communication (PLC) energy sensor that is used for monetization of energy applications. The company expects it to improve reliability and reduce the cost of installing intelligent solar energy meters. Read the full press release: https://prwire.com.au/pr/71671/matter-announces-faraday-a-new-genre-of-solar-energysensor-for-the-internet-of-things-that-also-fixes-wireless-dead-zones
  12. Ramon Fernandes

    Nest launches in Australia

    Google's subsidiary Nest is launching in Australia today. The smart home pioneer enters the local residential market offering smoke detectors and security systems, but its most popular device, a machine-learning powered thermostat, is not being sold yet. More details: https://nest.com/press/leading-connected-home-brand-nest-launches-in-australia/
  13. orangerobot

    Unearthed Digital Tribes

    until
    Unearthed Digital Tribes Create a prototype with Raspberry Pi and allowance (to purchase extra hardware) provided. Industry mentors will be available throughout competition period and if you are based in Perth, there will be desk spaces at CORE and maker space, SOLDER for you to work out off. You could stand to win $2500! Register for the event here before 29 June, Thursday: http://unearthed.link/DT17_LP2
  14. orangerobot

    Invitation to Digital Tribes

    Hi everyone, Are you interested in developing something with a Raspberry Pi? Unearthed is running an event, Digital Tribes, which presents great opportunities to connect with industry and utilize your IoT skills on real-world challenges. It is free to participate, with Raspberry Pis and some money for additional hardware provided. You could stand to win up to $2500! Industry mentors are available throughout the competition period and if you are based in Perth, there will be desk spaces at CORE and maker space SOLDER for you to work out of. The event officially launches on 30 June, with the deadline for submissions on 14 July. More information available here: http://unearthed.link/DT17_LP2 Cheers, Eunice
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