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Tim Kannegieter

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  1. To make things easier for you we are now offering a bulk webinar registration service. Community members can now register for an entire year of webinars just once instead of having to register for each webinar individually. To subscribe (free for EA members) just: Email iotengineering@engineersaustralia.org.au with your name and membership number You will receive an email with the webinar link a few days before each IoT event. You can unsubscribe at any time by emailing the same address After one year we will invite you to resubscribe. I you don't respond you will drop of the list. Note: Non members can purchase a subscription at EA Books. Please share this with non-members, or better still, suggest they join Engineers Australia.
  2. Great question Heath, If you turn up to the webinar you can ask the question yourself. Otherwise i will ask it for you. Cheers Tim
  3. Why would you buy a building management system at a huge upfront cost when you can get one for free, in return for monthly service fees that actually drive down the total cost of ownership? Following is a preview of a webinar on building management systems being run by this community on 6 March. I would be interested in your comments and questions we might ask of the presenter. The Internet of Things (IoT) is disrupting virtually all industries but it is particularly effective in challenging conventional approaches to control systems. Building Management Systems (BMS) are archetypal control systems with multiple sensors driving actuators to optimally maintain a comfortable working environment. Historically, large commercial and industrial projects have looked to proprietary systems from large vendors, partly because they were initially the only options on the table, and perhaps with a bit of the “if you buy IBM you won’t get sacked mentality”. However, the IoT is changing all the assumptions which underpinned previous procurement decision making and in particular it is opening up the market to competition from a wide range of start-ups. These start-ups aim to not just innovate the technology, but challenge the entire business model. The first impact of IoT on the BMS industry has been the dramatic plunge in the cost in sensing, communication and installation. Traditional BMS systems typically have a price tag in the order of AU$5000 per sensor point plus ongoing maintenance, and budgets typically allowed for a small number of devices. One consequence is that a large percentage of BMS systems are just used for alarms. Moving away from proprietary systems, that price point is now closer the $150 mark per month including maintenance, allowing thousands of sensors to be deployed for the same price. This opens the possibility of not just a finer level of control in more locations but an increased ability to diagnose system wide issues. In addition, the advent of new communication technologies in the form of Low Power Wide Area Networks is facilitating cheap secure communication without the need for wiring. The cost of data wiring is prohibitively expensive and wireless connection with low power devices that can run on a battery for years has been a game changer. There are other benefits as well, including LPWAN’s superior performance in building penetration, inbuilt security protocols and much longer battery life. Large BMS vendors have been responding to the challenge with their own versions of the “Industrial Internet of Things”, opening up their devices to be more interoperable with other systems and trading off their brand recognition to maintain market share. However, the procurement process remains the same with all the associated issues around the lowest cost tendering process and the adversarial relationships arising from dealing with faults during the Defects Liability Period. With the coming of IoT and all the associated start-ups, the competitive landscape has been radically altered. These challengers are now looking to escalate the challenge by upending the entire business model of the BMS industry – by doing away with set price contracts and delivering BMS as a service. One such company is Blue IoT, a Melbourne-based company that is now offering building management systems as a service, or more precisely, Software Data Analytics as a service. Blue IoT will be delivering a webinar to the Engineers Australia Applied IoT Engineering Community on 6 March 2018. Under this startup’s new business model, the client pays no upfront fee for the sensors or whatever associated building services such as HVAC that are included as part of the contract (depending if it is a new install or a refurbishment). Rather, the costs are absorbed in monthly service fees that include all maintenance and optimisation of the system. Importantly the service includes a human layer where data coming back from the system is analysed by electrical, mechanical and controls engineers who specialise in determining root causes of issues and fixing the problem the first time. The crux of this new business model is a guarantee that the system will deliver specified savings (if the project is a refurbishment) or function at an agreed performance level. If the system does not there are associated penalties for the service provider. Another big change is that the client owns the data and, if it serves out the agreed contract span, it also take ownership of the sensor and actuator hardware which is all non-proprietary. This allows the owner to change service providers if they wish, but of course the service provider will be doing their level best to keep their business. At the heart of this model is a move away from the adversarial relationships that have plagued the building industry. In an upcoming webinar (see below), Blue IoT founder Bob Sharon will explain how tenders are typically awarded on the basis of lowest price there is typically no margin for error – either in the delivery of the product or in the original specification. What results in buck passing from the lead contractor right down to the smallest suppliers and back to the client if they dare to ask for the smallest change to the original spec. With a service model, the building services integrator is completely incentivised to deal with all the problems and get the system performing at the highest level. There are a number of beneficial side effects arising from this change in responsibility for system performance. Typically, facility managers would see alerts relating to a particular part of the system, say a pump, and call the relevant contractor to fix it. However, the root cause of the problem may be elsewhere in the system and facilities mangers are not typically experts in diagnosing problems in what are increasingly complicated systems. However, service providers have the benefit of being able to collate data across the hundreds or thousands of different building management systems and sensors they manage and develop expertise not only in diagnosis but in preventative maintenance. A key game changer in service based IoT solutions is that all data is typically uploaded to the cloud where big data analytics can be usefully deployed to pro-actively monitor and optimise smart buildings and cities. Over time, machine learning will play an increasing a role in analytics, delivering a step change in performance. It is these kinds of IoT technologies that give service providers the confidence to offer performance guarantees. This paradigm shift of turning products into a service is at the heart of the IoT revolution. We see it over and over again in the most successful IoT startups. Swimming pool filtration systems are now being delivered free in return for a service contract guaranteeing crystal clear water quality. Garbage bins can be delivered free to Councils in return for a service contract guaranteeing they will be emptied just before they reach capacity. Success is rooted not just in technological innovation but in the reimagining of business models. Dr Tim Kannegieter is the Knowledge Manager at Engineers Australia charged with sharing knowledge around emerging technologies.
  4. Type your questions for today's webinar in the comments to this post. The webinar is on "The Internet of Incarceration" by Dan Hunter. During the webinar, you might like to comment on any of the presenter's points, or share your own experiences managing IoT Projects.
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    Recording: This webinar has now passed. Members of Engineers Australia can view the recording for free on MyPortal. Logon and navigate to Industry Applications > Building ____________________________________________________________________ Presenter: Bob Sharon, Chief Innovation Officer, Blue IoT Description: Building Management Systems as a Service is a concept that is threating to change the building industry as the internet of things continues to disrupt virtually every industry and traditional engineering approaches. Cheaper internet connected sensors can now be used to saturate a building providing far more data points connected to advanced cloud based analytical systems that deliver superior performance. In a prime example of the “democratisation of data”, this presentation looks at how building owners are being empowered to own their data while allowing service providers to help them optimise the efficiency and sustainability of their facilities. This approach also facilitates auditing of the actual performance of building management systems during the critical Defects Liability Period. Security is managed through protocols that minimise the risk of devices being hijacked, hacked or used as channels to get to corporate networked computers and servers. About the presenter: Bob Sharon is a passionate “disruptor” and supporter of the blue economy, being deeply involved in how buildings can help shape a more sustainable environment while further reducing costs and risks. He sees IoT as a critical enabler and disruptor that will drive better business outcomes in a sustainable way. His focus is on efficient and innovative data centres in APAC, he is a NABERS accredited assessor who conducted the world’s first NABERS rating on a data centre (which was back in 2013) and he is a member of the executive council of the IoT Alliance Australia. Prior to founding Blue IoT in June 2016, Bob has held a number of roles in the smart buildings and data centre spaces. He is also currently Chief Innovation Officer for iHome Energy, Founder, CEO of Entrepreneur’s Angels and Non Executive Director of The Stardust Foundation.
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    Recording: This webinar has now passed. Members of Engineers Australia can view the recording for free on MyPortal. Logon and navigate to Functions > Tracking. _____________________________________________________________________________________ Presenter: Tony Lotzof, CEO and Founder of Leash It Description: Asset tracking is enjoying a resurgence as a complement to the asset management suite of tools due to the dramatically falling costs facilitated by the IoT. It is now possible to track tens of thousands of devices cheaply and deliver analytics that support applications around compliance, productivity and security. For example, mission critical assets, such as an ECG unit that must not be removed from an emergency room, can be monitored and alerts sent if required. Similarly, commonplace items such as laptops or fire extinguishers can be tracked to ensure they are not stolen. Nurses spend up to 30 minutes per shift looking for equipment and RTLS (Real Time Location Services) asset tracking can provide an app that allows them to go straight to what they need. Conversely, asset tracking can also be used to track the movement of people. One application is induction processes in construction, where alerts are raised if a new employee goes into an area they have not been inducted into or are not authorised to do so, reducing OH&S risks. A particular focus of this webinar is asset tracking inside large multi-story buildings, where current communication solutions can find it difficult to pinpoint the exact location of an object on a floor plan. This webinar looks at a particular solution to this challenge that makes use of low energy Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, multiple gateways and software to constantly map the location of assets within the infrastructure. Sensors for heat, humidity and accelerometer can be added to the suite as well. About the presenter: Tony founded Leash It in late 2014 after his bike was stolen from outside a café, while enjoying a coffee with friends. He wanted better way to secure his bike, quickly and easily, without carrying a chain. From this idea Cycle Leash was born and quickly morphed in to many more verticals and the company has had over 35,000 downloads of their App and is now available internationally. Leash It has evolved from a consumer product into commercial asset tracking and soon a smart cities solution. Prior to founding Leash It, Tony held IT roles in a number of businesses.
  7. Type your questions for today's webinar in the comments to this post. The webinar is on Project Management for IoT. During the webinar, you might like to comment on any of the presenter's points, or share your own experiences managing IoT Projects.
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    View the recording: This webinar has passed. Members of Engineers Australia can view the recording for free on MyPortal. Logon and navigate to Industry Applications > Manufacturing Presenters: Dr Steve Dowey, Technology Manager, Sutton Tools Description: There are shared global challenges to the adoption of Industry 4.0 that affect businesses on all steps of the digital journey. These are cost of implementation, a shortage of skilled employees, and a concern about security. Although these problems are global, the solutions need to be local and targeted. The ‘Smart Enough’ concept uses a data driven manufacturing and management approach to enable the promised benefits of IoT and Industry 4.0 for companies that might be struggling with implementation. Dr Dowey will share and demonstrate the technology that is deployed at Sutton Tools for its take on Lean IoT. Takeaways: Smart Enough is: Management data driven - enables transparency and immediacy of processes. Lean. Leaves control and action to the experts and systems. Feedback loop is closed by the operator / manager. Uses micro-service architectures. Complements but doesn’t need an Enterprise Service Bus or SOA. Works with legacy systems. Applying a lightweight sensor network overlay onto existing systems, leveraging web technology, RAD tools and open source. About the presenter: Dr Steve Dowey is the Technology Manager at Sutton Tools and a Senior Research Fellow at RMIT University working with the Australian Defence Materials Technology Centre. His current projects include ‘Additive Manufactured Tooling’, ‘Tooling for Robotic Applications’ and applied ‘Industry IoT’ in collaboration with DMTC. Steve’s Industry 4.0 focus is on the ‘The Smart Enough Factory’, where the issues of legacy systems (cost), security and STEM skills are addressed to ensure the benefits of Industry 4.0 can reach the Australian SME.
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    View the recording: This webinar has now passed. Members of Engineers Australia can view the recording for free on MyPortal. Logon and navigate to Industry Applications > Other ____________________________________________________________________________ Presenters: Professor Dan Hunter, Foundation Dean, Swinburne Law School Description: Replacing prisons with high tech systems capable of detaining prisoners in their own homes and the use of artificial intelligence to predict and prevent imminent offenses may sound the stuff of science fiction, but rapid advances in technology surrounding the Internet of Thing makes such a vision a possibility worth discussing. Prof Hunter has been making news proposing just such a system, which revolves the around the use of electronic bracelets with electric shock capabilities. This effectively turn prisoners into internet nodes, capable of being monitored and controlled like any other IoT system. In this presentation, Prof Hunter will outline technology advances in prisons around the world and discusses the legal, social and engineering dimensions of making the vision a reality. About the presenter: Professor Dan Hunter is expert in internet law, intellectual property and cognitive science models of law. He holds a PhD from Cambridge on the nature of legal reasoning, as well as computer science and law degrees from Monash University and a Master of Laws by research from the University of Melbourne. Professor Hunter regularly publishes on the intersection of computers and law including using technology to make sentencing more efficient and fairer. His recent articles include recommendations for allowing prisoners to access the internet, making internet deprivation a new stand-alone criminal sanction and replacing prisons with technological incarceration.
  10. According to news reports. See https://www.itnews.com.au/news/new-mirai-copycat-iot-botnet-spreading-475936
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    View the recording: This webinar has passed. Members of Engineers Australia can view the recording for free on MyPortal. Logon and navigate to Practices > Project Management ______________________________________________________________________________________ Description: Project management of IoT projects can pose special challenges, which arise from the range of complex technologies which are typically incorporated into an IoT system. Project teams will typically be challenged by technologies with which they are unfamiliar, and will need to seek assistance from suppliers and expert consultants. The presentation will identify these challenges, and provide practical strategies for overcoming them. What you will learn: How to specify IoT system technical requirements Identification and selection of technology solutions Recognising and overcoming technical risks Determination regulatory requirements and how to comply with them Team skills and competencies A staged approach to development Dealing with aspects where specialist assistance may be required About the presenter: Genesys founder and CEO Geoff Sizer has a lifelong passion for electronics and technology, and an ongoing commitment to the electronics engineering profession. He has more than 35 years experience in electronic product development ranging from complex systems to simple consumer goods for a diverse range of industries and applications. Geoff is a Fellow of Engineers Australia, a Chartered Professional Engineer and registered on the National Professional Engineers Register. As a former President of the IREE, Geoff was instrumental in the formation of the ITEE College in Engineers Australia and is a past chair. He has championed the formation of the Applied IOT Community of practice.. During his career Geoff has acted as a Director or Chief Technical Officer for several leading technology.
  12. 18 Oct "Apple and GE today announced a partnership to deliver powerful industrial apps designed to bring predictive data and analytics from Predix, GE’s industrial Internet of Things (IoT) platform, to iPhone and iPad. The two companies unveiled a new Predix software development kit (SDK) for iOS, which gives developers the tools to make their own powerful industrial IoT apps." More info https://www.apple.com/newsroom/2017/10/apple-and-ge-partner-to-bring-predix-industrial-apps-to-iphone-and-ipad/
  13. Yes, agree with pretty much all that. I would tend not to be too dismissive of the value of learning the principles of coding. At my daughter's age, the concepts of IF/THEN constructs and all the other coding principles are all very new and worthwhile I think. And primarily at this stage, I think my aim is just to get her enthusiastic about learning, so the scratch level programs have been great and she still has some way to run with it. However, I take your point that she will pretty quickly run out of runway to learn with just coding which is why I am already thinking about what next. Your point about teachers asking what will you drop is very valid. They don't teach this stuff in normal school time for that very reason. However, as a parent I have oodles of after school time and holidays to fill which I would like to be as enriching as possible, hence my interest in this. I'm not actually particularly focused on coding or even STEM. However, I did attend a DATA 61 event where one of the keynote speakers was 9 years old and was a little blown away by the potential of young people to create a future using data. As you say, its what you do with the data rather than coding as a skill that will make the difference. However, I think understanding how to manipulate data via coding will be \ a modern day skill that should sit alongside other skills like literacy and mathematics. But how to develop it over time in a reasonable fashion? I put up a proposal in EA about a year ago to launch a STEM Outreach Community, whereby deliverers of STEM education services such as yourself could collaborate and learn from each other. It hasn't got traction yet but I remain hopeful. Cheers Tim
  14. See https://www.aiia.com.au/events/upcoming-events/south-australia-events2/southaustralia/the-smart-mining-conference
  15. Interesting news on how a computer manufacturer aims to get on the IoT bandwagon. http://www.theaustralian.com.au/business/technology/dell-bets-big-on-internet-of-things/news-story/892c8d8495756ab387e021579dba7f22
  16. Multiple media reports out that Vodafone has launched their NB-IoT network, with two clients to trial it. Limited geographic coverage around central Sydney and Melbourne with wider roll out next year. See https://www.itnews.com.au/news/vodafone-switches-on-nb-iot-network-475139
  17. Hi Heath, Just followed up on your link. Well done you! MiniSparx sounds like a great initiative. Newcastle based only? Re Scratch, I don't think there is any issue with Scratch and the demise of the industry in the article you linked sounds more like a law of supply and demand issue. My 6.5yr daughter has done four days now on Scratch and has the basic concepts mastered. She still struggles with slight more complicated things. The main point is that she is using a computer screen to create things rather than just mindlessly watch YouTube videos. What it has make me think about is progression. By the time she is 9 or 10 she will be beyond basic programming stuff. What would be good is a pathway to progress kids through ever more challenging things such as robots and even the IoT stuff Chi Bihn Le talked about. Ideally this would extend over their entire schooling. I was actually imagining her graduating from highschool with a fully fledged ICT degree. Its not has crazy as it sounds because I'm continually amazed at my daughter's ability to absorb complex ideas and use the tools to create quite sophisticated aps and she is not yet seven. She is not particularly bright either. She just has what every young child has when the learning is fun. It also has to be affordable. I pay about $40 a day for normal school holiday activities at the local school after ours care. Admittedly that is cheap but I pay about $100 per day for the code camp stuff, so the temptation to leave her in there is great.
  18. You mentioned "new business models for the water industry". What are they?
  19. Can you easily instrument existing mechanical meters? What are the challenges involved? Answer transcribed from webinar response by Rian Sullings (WaterGroup P/L): In Australia there are roughly 24 million water meters. Coincidentally, a similar number to the population, so most houses have a couple of people in them, but then if you consider all the other buildings and infrastructure, it adds up to a similar number. The vast majority of those meters are mechanical. They have moving parts. They're similar to a clock. They've got a register (like a car odometer). The meters themselves are designed to last for 10 or 15 years in situ. They wear out over time. They become less accurate. It is possible to replace an entire water meter with a smart-enabled meter, but it's also possible to retrofit devices on to those mechanical meters to make use of the physical asset that's already sitting there and will likely sit there for years to come. Most of the mechanical meters that have been deployed in Australia for the past decade or two have a provision for a data output. I think the thinking was that, "We don't quite have the technology yet, but we know we will in the future, so let's put data outputs on all the mechanical meters." The most common way of extracting the data is by attaching a sensor into the meter. If you imagine the register, it's a number of dials and they rotate as the water flows through. On some of those dials there is a magnet and that magnet makes revolutions with the dials or gears. For example, every 10 litres that passes through the meter, a dial might make one full revolution, so then you can use a reed switch or a hall effect sensor to detect when the magnet is close to or further away from the sensor. Then you can count how many times the water meters turns over time. You can use data logging to timestamp that.
  20. At 12pm 10 October 2017, this community hosted a webinar will be held on Smart Metering for Water with the IoT. In the comments on this post are some of the questions asked by the audience. Feel free to respond to the questions directly. To post a question/comment you need to: (register and) logon to this community site in the top right hand corner Navigate to Forums > IoT Engineering and locate the post with name of the webinar
  21. Description: The topic of Big Data presents many challenges but also new opportunities. The recent success of deep learning is an example of the latter, where big amounts of training data enable large artificial neural networks to achieve super-human performance on tasks such as object detection and classification. Forward-looking companies and organisations around the world are currently massively investing in this domain. In this seminar we will look at some relevant basic algorithmic concepts but also report on experiences and plans of our research team when navigating through a time that some people call the “Big Bang of Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning”. About the presenter: Stephan Chalup (Ph.D., Dipl.-Math.) is an Associate Professor at the University of Newcastle in Australia where he is leading the Interdisciplinary Machine Learning Research Group and the Newcastle Robotics Lab. He studied mathematics with neuroscience at the University of Heidelberg and received his Ph.D. in Computing Science from the Machine Learning Research Centre at Queensland University of Technology (QUT) in Brisbane in 2002. Over the past fifteen years he published over 90 research articles in areas such as artificial neural networks, machine learning and autonomous intelligent agents. He is on the editorial boards of several journals and has presented research seminars, for example, at Harbin Institute of Technology in China (HIT), at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) in Germany, and at The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in the USA. When: 5:30pm midday AEST (Sydney)
  22. See this report: https://www.arnnet.com.au/article/627814/sigfox-shows-20-cent-iot-wireless-module/?fp=2&fpid=1
  23. until
    Description: The topic of Big Data presents many challenges but also new opportunities. The recent success of deep learning is an example of the latter, where big amounts of training data enable large artificial neural networks to achieve super-human performance on tasks such as object detection and classification. Forward-looking companies and organisations around the world are currently massively investing in this domain. In this seminar we will look at some relevant basic algorithmic concepts but also report on experiences and plans of our research team when navigating through a time that some people call the “Big Bang of Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning”. About the presenter: Stephan Chalup (Ph.D., Dipl.-Math.) is an Associate Professor at the University of Newcastle in Australia where he is leading the Interdisciplinary Machine Learning Research Group and the Newcastle Robotics Lab. He studied mathematics with neuroscience at the University of Heidelberg and received his Ph.D. in Computing Science from the Machine Learning Research Centre at Queensland University of Technology (QUT) in Brisbane in 2002. Over the past fifteen years he published over 90 research articles in areas such as artificial neural networks, machine learning and autonomous intelligent agents. He is on the editorial boards of several journals and has presented research seminars, for example, at Harbin Institute of Technology in China (HIT), at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) in Germany, and at The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in the USA.
  24. According to a CRN News report, Telstra has turned on its national IoT network. See https://www.crn.com.au/news/telstra-quietly-switches-on-internet-of-things-network-473757 I cant see any announcements of Telstra's website though. If you know any more please link in the comments. Meanwhile, Telstra has announced the first four IoT startups to to be supported by its Muru-D incubator. https://www.telstra.com.au/aboutus/media/media-releases/Telstra-announces-first-IoT-focused-cohort-with-muru-D-MEL1
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