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Tim Kannegieter

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Everything posted by Tim Kannegieter

  1. Project Management for IoT

    Type your questions for today's webinar in the comments to this post. The webinar is on Project Management for IoT. During the webinar, you might like to comment on any of the presenter's points, or share your own experiences managing IoT Projects.
  2. The ‘Smart Enough’ Factory.

    until
    This special event marking our 50th webinar and the end of year celebration. We will be holding a webinar combined with face-to-face meetings in several EA offices in: Sydney - Boardroom Melbourne - Leadership Hub Adelaide - Grant Hosking Room Hobart - Leadership Room Canberra - The Black Mountain Room Newcastle - Boardroom Title: The ‘Smart Enough’ Factory. A digital journey and IoT Case study on Sutton Tools Presenters: Dr Steve Dowey, Technology Manager, Sutton Tools Description: There are shared global challenges to the adoption of Industry 4.0 that affect businesses on all steps of the digital journey. These are cost of implementation, a shortage of skilled employees, and a concern about security. Although these problems are global, the solutions need to be local and targeted. The ‘Smart Enough’ concept uses a data driven manufacturing and management approach to enable the promised benefits of IoT and Industry 4.0 for companies that might be struggling with implementation. Dr Dowey will share and demonstrate the technology that is deployed at Sutton Tools for its take on Lean IoT. Takeaways: Smart Enough is: Management data driven - enables transparency and immediacy of processes. Lean. Leaves control and action to the experts and systems. Feedback loop is closed by the operator / manager. Uses micro-service architectures. Complements but doesn’t need an Enterprise Service Bus or SOA. Works with legacy systems. Applying a lightweight sensor network overlay onto existing systems, leveraging web technology, RAD tools and open source. Who should attend: The talk is for SME stakeholders, lean manufacturing practitioners and anyone with an interest in IoT in manufacturing. About the presenter: Dr Steve Dowey is the Technology Manager at Sutton Tools and a Senior Research Fellow at RMIT University working with the Australian Defence Materials Technology Centre. His current projects include ‘Additive Manufactured Tooling’, ‘Tooling for Robotic Applications’ and applied ‘Industry IoT’ in collaboration with DMTC. Steve’s Industry 4.0 focus is on the ‘The Smart Enough Factory’, where the issues of legacy systems (cost), security and STEM skills are addressed to ensure the benefits of Industry 4.0 can reach the Australian SME. When: 5:30pm AEST (Eastern Seaboard) for 6:00pm start on 12 December 2017. The presentation will last 30 minutes followed by question time and networking. Concludes at 7:30pm. Where: The presentation by both webinar and face-to-face in the following locations. After registering you will be sent details of how to logon if attending by webinar. Rooms and locations are below. Please RSVP if attending in person by emailing iotengineering@engineersaustralia.org.au Sydney – Boardroom, Level 3, 8 Thomas St, Chatswood. Victoria - Leadership Hub, Level 31, 600 Bourke Street, Melbourne South Australia - Grant Hosking Room, Level 11, 108 King William Street, Adelaide Tasmania - Leadership Room, Level 5, 188 Collins Street, Hobart Canberra - The Black Mountain Room, Engineering House, 11 National Circuit, Barton Newcastle – Boardroom, Suite 3, Tonella Commercial Centre, 125 Bull Street, Newcastle West Cost: This presentation is free to members of Engineers Australia (EA), the Australian Computer Society (ACS), the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) and IEEE. Just provide your membership number during registration for the event. The cost for non-members is $30. How to register: Please register on the Engineers Australia event system, link above. Note, to register you need to have a free EA ID which you can get on the first screen of the registration page. Take note of your ID number for future events.
  3. Prisons and IoT

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    Title: The Internet of Incarceration: How IoT technologies could change the way prisons operate Presenters: Professor Dan Hunter, Foundation Dean, Swinburne Law School Description: Replacing prisons with high tech systems capable of detaining prisoners in their own homes and the use of artificial intelligence to predict and prevent imminent offenses may sound the stuff of science fiction, but rapid advances in technology surrounding the Internet of Thing makes such a vision a possibility worth discussing. Prof Hunter has been making news proposing just such a system, which revolves the around the use of electronic bracelets with electric shock capabilities. This effectively turn prisoners into internet nodes, capable of being monitored and controlled like any other IoT system. In this presentation, Prof Hunter will outline technology advances in prisons around the world and discusses the legal, social and engineering dimensions of making the vision a reality. About the presenter: Professor Dan Hunter is expert in internet law, intellectual property and cognitive science models of law. He holds a PhD from Cambridge on the nature of legal reasoning, as well as computer science and law degrees from Monash University and a Master of Laws by research from the University of Melbourne. Professor Hunter regularly publishes on the intersection of computers and law including using technology to make sentencing more efficient and fairer. His recent articles include recommendations for allowing prisoners to access the internet, making internet deprivation a new stand-alone criminal sanction and replacing prisons with technological incarceration. When: 12 midday in Sydney. If you are in a state with a different time zone from NSW, please determine your local time. The date is above. The presentation will last 30 minutes followed by question time. Where: The presentation is by webinar. After registering you will be sent details of how to logon. Cost: This presentation is free to members of Engineers Australia (EA), the Australian Computer Society (ACS), the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) and IEEE. Just provide your membership number during registration for the event. The cost for non-members is $30. How to register: Please register on the Engineers Australia event system, link above. Note, to register you need to have a free EA ID which you can get on the first screen of the registration page. Take note of your ID number for future events.
  4. Energy Harvesting

    Introduction Energy harvesting, also known as power scavenging, is the term used to describe methods for powering IoT devices from its local environment, rather than by mains power or primary batteries. The main sources of environmental power are photovoltaic, thermoelectric, kinetic, and radio frequency. These are complement by energy harvesting and power storage systems. A key misconception is that people equate power scavenging with perpetual life, that device will run forever. However, all systems have limitations. For example, a rechargeable cell powered by a solar panel will die after a period of time or a set number of cycles. So the intelligent design of energy harvesting systems is important, and this may or may not include a battery. Kinetic Kinetic energy harvesting systems are powered by physical motion. Available wherever thing are moving. Examples range from sources of micro-power, such as switches/buttons and watches/wearables through to larger sources such as wind and water. The micro-sources produce a small spike of energy that is just enough to send a small piece of information. The larger sources do not have to be traditional wind power or hydroelectric systems. From an IOT perspective, it is possible to create miniature devices that fit inside pipes to power a single device. It is possible to fit energy harvesting devices inside pipes with moving water to power an IOT device measuring the flow in remote locations. Thermoelectric Thermoelectric energy harvesting systems are powered by differences in temperature, usually between a source at a higher or lower temperature and the ambient environment. Thermoelectric sources are often available in industrial settings which often have, for example, cold or hot pipes. There are even products that can generate power from the difference between skin temperature and the surrounding air, to power a wearable device. Solar Solar, also known as optical energy, has been used for a long time has been used in many different applications because the power density that can be generated from a solar cell is reasonable significant for its size. The main challenge with optical energy is to model how big a solar panel, and associated power storage system, needs to be to make sure that an IoT system will function through natural variations in light levels and in the worst case scenario. Radio Frequencies RF energy harvesting system, and the closely related induction charging, can extract energy from radio waves, in the same way that old crystal set radios extracted enough energy from AM broadcasts to listen to them without a batter. However, this approach has the lowest efficiency of all the harvesting techniques because the amount of power that must be broadcast in order to get a tiny little bit of power exchange over even a small distance is huge. The most useful example of this technique is the use of passive RFID tags, which normally consist of a tiny chip and very thin antenna. As the RFID tag passes through a gate or scanner, there is a wireless power exchange that's very short range. The main reason RFID tags can be manufactured for few cents and last such a long time is because have no battery. Engineering challenges The main engineering challenge is knowing when it is appropriate to use energy harvesting. There are a small number of applications where energy harvesting just makes sense, such as switches and some solar cells on devices that are visited regularly. However, many people fall into the trap of including energy harvesting in their IoT design because they can, when it fact it might not make sense to use it. For example, a kinetically charged dog tracking collar is possible but a battery may much more cost effective. Possible applications where energy harvesting does make sense are: Unusual form factors –e,g, where you've got to get something really thin, woven into clothing etc. Massive deployment applications – e.g. where it's not commercially feasible to replace or recharge batteries. Inconvenient locations – e.g. places that are really difficult to get to. Power storage Power storage option range from batteries through super-capacitors to solid-state options. The main factors to consider are cycle life, before the component needs to be replaced, the rate at which it goes flat, the overall storage capacity and the length of time the charge is available to execute the IoT device’s function. A comparison of common power storage options. Diagram curtesy of Simon Blyth, LX Group. High density rechargeable battery technologies generally have a self-discharge problem and can be hard to charge up using the small sources of power available via some sources of energy harvesting. Super capacities obviously only hold their charge for a very short time but provide an alternative in the right contexts, particularly where the device is being charged/discharged frequently. Examples may be on rotating equipment etc. Energy harvesting chips Many manufacturers are now making chip-based solutions that make it easier to design an energy harvesting system into an IoT device. Comparison of a range of chip-based energy harvesting systems. Diagram curtesy of Simon Blyth, LX Group. Selection of the right energy harvesting chip would relate to the overall architecture and design of the IoT device. Technology companies Key suppliers of energy harvesting technologies include: Micropelt Laird PowerFilm IXYS Kinetron Volture WiTricity IDT Cota Powercast muRata Panasonic Maxwell Cymbet Infinite Power Solutions Sources: Information on this page was primarily sourced from the following: A webinar titled Power Scavenging in IoT Design by Simon Blyth, CEO, LX Group
  5. Legal considerations for IoT

    Introduction Internet of Things (IoT) projects are a complex multiparty undertaking, requiring the cooperation of asset owners, technology providers, consultants, communication service providers, and a range of other stakeholders. IoT projects have a range of technologies that have legal implications such as copyright ownership of circuit board designs and firmware. Adding to this, the securing of legal rights for the use and maintenance of the ICT systems is critical to the ongoing operation of these projects. Successful delivery and operation of these assets requires effective communication, a sound understanding of the legal landscape, and practical systems and procedures to secure the strength of your legal position if things escalate Ownership of the legal rights required enable an IoT project to function throughout its life cycle should be treated as a key project deliverable. The legal rights underpinning the business model (eg. developer, service provider, product reseller, maintenance provider) should also be secured in writing to avoid legal disputes about who owns items such as software licences, firmware and hardware, and what rights each party has to use them. A common source of legal disputes in IoT projects is relying on verbal assurances rather than formally documenting agreements in writing, as verbal assurances tend to carry little weight in court. Terms and legislation relevant to IoT projects Some legal terms and legislation relevant to IoT projects are defined below: Express terms (contract): Terms that are agreed between contracted parties, either in writing or verbally. Implied terms (contract): Terms that are not expressly written in to the contract, or verbally agreed, but can be implied by the court based on common law or the actions and intentions of the contracted parties (see section below on effective contract management of IoT projects. Estoppel: This is a point of law which prevents a party from denying something. There are two kinds of estoppel: Promissory: if one party has promised another party that something will happen, and the second party relies on this promise and suffers detrimental effects it is not kept. For example, if an IoT company designs a system to monitor and send alerts about the condition of airfields, which will only be commercially viable if a major airport agrees to be a customer. The designer emails or phones the airport and lets them know that they intend for them to be a customer and the airport agrees. If the designer designs the system, and the airport later decides not to become a customer, it is possible that under estoppel, a court can rule that the airport does need to become a user of the system, or award damages to the designer. It is better if the promise and possible detriment are documented in writing. By convention: if two parties conduct business in a particular way, then one does something to contradict that. For example, if a client pays a communication provider’s monthly fees late for several months and they accept those late payments without penalty (even though the contract says fees need to be paid on time or supply will be cut off). If the communication provider suddenly decides to cut off supply due to a late payment, the court may rule against them as they have set a convention contradictory to their written contract by accepting late payments. Telecommunications law: including the Telecommunications Act 1997 and the Radiocommunications (Low Interference Potential Devices) Class Licence 2015. Australian Consumer Law (ACL): Some elements of ACL are particularly relevant to IoT projects: (Statutory) Unconscionable conduct (Section 20 of the ACL) is the principal by which a stronger party is not allowed to take advantage of a weaker party in supplying or acquiring goods. This can apply in some cases if software is purchased and does not work as expected or have the help desk support required. Misleading or deceptive conduct: The Competition and Consumer Act (2010) states that a person must not engage in conduct that is misleading or deceptive, or is likely to mislead or deceive. In 2013, the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) took Google to the High Court over its display of sponsored links. The ACCC lost, because the court ruled that reasonable users would understand that the content of the sponsored links was created and endorsed by the advertisers, not Google. Warranties & unfair terms: ACL imposes mandatory warranties and invalidates unfair terms. This may be useful for small IoT businesses or consumers who purchase software or services with inflexible terms and conditions (eg. as defined on the software company’s website when purchase is made online). Other relevant legal areas include: Intellectual Property: It is important to know who owns the intellectual property of the software, firmware and hardware used in projects, as if it is produced by independent contractors for a parent company, disputes can disadvantage clients. It is also important to clarify who owns the intellectual property rights for solutions and products produced. Copyright: This is important as IoT projects use software, firmware and hardware which is subject to copyright. In one copyright case IPC Global took Pavetest to court because a developer had taken source code and firmware from IPC Global to Pavetest and used it to develop a system. Even using a small, functionally significant part of the software code can be a breach of copyright and result in damages being awarded to the copyright holder. Negligence: This may be applicable if there is a duty of care which was not carried out responsibly, and damage results. Security of Payment Act: This may be relevant when IoT systems are installed in buildings, as it ensures that suppliers of construction work and related goods get paid on time. One example of a case was between Ampcontrol SWG Pty Limited and Gujarat NRE Wonga in 2013, when Gujarat failed to meet a payment deadline. Home Building Act: This may be relevant for systems installed in residential homes. Privacy legislation: this governs confidential information that may be collected by the system. Considerations can include a privacy policy and mandatory reporting of data breaches Sources of legal disputes in the IoT industry Software rights can be a significant vulnerability for IoT projects. For example, a software supplier can tender software to competitors or threaten to disable system software as leverage during a dispute unless there has been a written agreement that prevents them from doing so. Software companies can also go out of business, or be subject to intellectual property disputes, so it is important to determine what assurances and guarantees are needed to ensure that your project can continue to use necessary software. Liability clauses are also an important consideration: if a system supplier falls behind in delivering goods required by a project, this can be a significant cost, and agreement should be made about how that will be dealt with. Direct supply of parts and services from a supplier can also be a vulnerable point for IoT companies relying on particular system suppliers unless a written distributor or supply agreement is put in place. Courts are also wary of making rulings that help companies establish monopolies in order to make their business models effective, as they want to ensure that the end user is assured ongoing supply of goods. Safeguarding legal rights for IoT projects requires a broad understanding of legal measures available. For example, an agreement to ensure that there are no backdoor channels to disable software or exploit other system vulnerabilities, such as cyber security, could be approached by ensuring there is a warranty against these backdoors being present, liquidated damages if they do arise, and court injunctions if the company supplying your software introduces backdoor channels after agreeing not to. One area that could be used in such a case if it goes to court is damage to the goodwill of the business using the software, which is a form of intellectual property. One recent example of a dispute between an IoT company and a software supplier was between Australian company TMA Australia, which installed and maintained car park guidance systems for large clients, and the supplier of the systems, Indect. Prior to the dispute, there had been some discussion of TMA being the exclusive distributor for Indect systems in Australia (they were the sole distributor at that time), but this was never agreed or formalised in writing. TMA Australia had installed 15 systems in the four years leading up to the dispute, and signed maintenance agreements over 5-10 years for those systems, which had an expected life of around 15 years. Following a dispute over late supply of parts which led TMA to withhold payment of invoices, this dispute escalated to the point where Indect introduced three-monthly software authenticity checks and threatened to disable software in installed systems. When TMA announced that it would use another system supplier, Indect refused to supply parts for existing installations directly to TMA, but forced them to buy parts to fulfil their maintenance contracts through a third party distributor. Effective contract management of IoT projects If a contract to relies on a standard terms and condition sheet to lay out legal rights of each party in an IoT project, it is important to clarify which terms and conditions are relevant, and what these terms and conditions are referring to specifically for each project. To ensure that each party has read the terms and conditions sheet, a good practice is to require initials and dates at the bottom of each page of the Terms and Conditions. This can allow companies and suppliers entering into identify and resolve issues and differences in contract interpretation early, rather than disputing them following installation of systems when the stakes and operational impacts are higher. As mentioned in the section above, there are two kinds of terms in a contract: express and implied. Express terms are specifically agreed between parties, either in writing or orally (written terms are easier to verify). Implied terms are not written into a contract or agreed verbally, but can still apply to projects if they are part of the common law (these are terms that are implied by law). Standard contractual terms that are implied by law are: goods for sale are fit for their intended purpose: eg. a sensor sold for ocean temperature monitoring operates underwater professional services will be rendered with reasonable care Implied terms cannot contradict what is written in the contract (eg. if a contract states that sensors do not need to be fit for underwater use, the court will not rule that this term was implied) , and the intentions of the parties at the time they made the agreement. They can also be terms that allow the reasonable effective operation of the contract, or be an obvious implied condition (ie. it goes without saying that…). The implied term must also be able to be expressed clearly. Complex and convoluted implied terms are less likely to be approved in court. Terms can also be implied by fact if there has been no attempt by the contracted parties to record the entire contract in writing, based on the intentions and actions of the contracted parties. For example, one term implied by fact by the court in the previous example was that Indect had to facilitate the software authenticity checks they imposed on TMA Australia, because the terms of the software licence purchase implied that it would be licenced for use for the lifetime of the system, and be fit for purpose. However, TMA Australia was unsuccessful in their attempt to get the courts to rule that because they had entered into contracts to purchase systems from Indect, it was an implied term that they should continue to receive direct supply of parts and services for the life of the system at a price which was no less favourable than that offered to other Australian distributors. This was because at the time those contracts were made, there were no other distributors of the system in Australia, and therefore the court stated that no term could be implied because it would be difficult to gauge what sort of price would result before more distributors were on board. Effective dispute avoidance and resolution It is better to avoid a dispute rather than resolving one. Some ways in which the likelihood of a dispute taking place can be reduced are: Ensure terms are agreed in writing and clearly understood by contracted parties Maintain legally acceptable documentation (eg. minutes of discussions and confirmed acceptance, merge files for a running log of projects, initialled printed documentation) Be above board with customers. Particularly for IoT operators dealing with installations in residential properties, it can be fast and inexpensive for clients to make a claim with the state or territory civil and administrative tribunal (VCAT, QCAT). If the customer wins their hearing, it might mean that both their legal costs and damages need to be paid Employ a long term strategy with project partners you are dealing with regularly. Try to lock in some agreements in writing as they occur, even if you are not in agreement on everything. Embarking on the project without any agreements in place leaves a lot of room for dispute. Should a dispute occur, it is important to consider alternatives for coming to an agreement, and the strength of each legal party before going to court. This needs to be weighed against the potential for the time, cost and reputational damage of failing to reach an agreement outside court, as well as confidentiality implications. Legal advice should be sought early to assist with this process. It is also beneficial if teams have some understanding of the technology involved. Depending on which court the action is made in, the cost of court actions in the IoT space can be in the order of tens of thousands of dollars in preparation before the trail, once the lawyers, barristers, expert witnesses and QCs are paid their fees. For each day in court, the cost in legal fees can be in the order of tens of thousands of dollars, plus the time required to attend court. Range and Precedence of statutory requirements Some IoT projects can come under more than one piece of legislation, eg. Australian Commonwealth and state or territory legislation. There are also technical standards and statutory regulations that are relevant to IoT projects. These legal requirements may contradict each other or be inconsistent, so it is important to consider which order of precedence should be given to each level. In Australian law, the order of precedence is: Commonwealth legislation: eg. Australian Consumer Law (this over-rules any contradictory or inconsistent state or territory legislation) State or territory legislation: eg. Home Building Acts for IoT projects based in residential properties (eg. smart home projects). Both Commonwealth and state and territory law over-rule regulations and standards drafted under legislation. Regulations or standards: eg. Ministers can approve Australian standards for particular products, however these will be over-ruled if they are contradicted by the overarching legislation. Technical standards: These standards apply to system design and are particularly relevant for IoT projects. They include: Electromagnetic compatibility Radio communications compliance Specific product standards Specific field-related standards (eg. technical standards for IoT projects in medical industry). Sources: The information on this page was primarily from the following: Presentation by Ashley Kelso, Senior Associate, AustraLaw titled Managing the legal risk of IoT projects
  6. IoT_Reaper virus spreading

    According to news reports. See https://www.itnews.com.au/news/new-mirai-copycat-iot-botnet-spreading-475936
  7. Project management for the IoT

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    Recording: This webinar has now passed. Members of Engineers Australia can view the recording for free on MyPortal. Logon and navigate to Practices > Project Management. Others can purchase the recording on EABooks. This webinar is an activity of EA’s Applied IoT Engineering Community. See http://iot.engineersaustralia.org.au/ for more information. Title: Project management for the Internet of Things. Description: Project management of IoT projects can pose special challenges, which arise from the range of complex technologies which are typically incorporated into an IoT system. Project teams will typically be challenged by technologies with which they are unfamiliar, and will need to seek assistance from suppliers and expert consultants. The presentation will identify these challenges, and provide practical strategies for overcoming them. What you will learn: How to specify IoT system technical requirements Identification and selection of technology solutions Recognising and overcoming technical risks Determination regulatory requirements and how to comply with them Team skills and competencies A staged approach to development Dealing with aspects where specialist assistance may be required About the presenter: Genesys founder and CEO Geoff Sizer has a lifelong passion for electronics and technology, and an ongoing commitment to the electronics engineering profession. He has more than 35 years experience in electronic product development ranging from complex systems to simple consumer goods for a diverse range of industries and applications. Geoff is a Fellow of Engineers Australia, a Chartered Professional Engineer and registered on the National Professional Engineers Register. As a former President of the IREE, Geoff was instrumental in the formation of the ITEE College in Engineers Australia and is a past chair. He has championed the formation of the Applied IOT Community of practice.. During his career Geoff has acted as a Director or Chief Technical Officer for several leading technology When: 12 midday AEST (Sydney) on 14 November 2017. The presentation will last 30 minutes followed by question time. Where: The presentation is by webinar. After registering you will be sent details of how to logon. Cost: This presentation is free to members of Engineers Australia (EA), the Australian Computer Society (ACS), the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) and IEEE. Just provide your membership number during registration for the event. The cost for non-members is $30. How to register: Please register on the Engineers Australia event system, link above. Note, to register you need to have a free EA ID which you can get on the first screen of the registration page. Take note of your ID number for future events.
  8. 18 Oct "Apple and GE today announced a partnership to deliver powerful industrial apps designed to bring predictive data and analytics from Predix, GE’s industrial Internet of Things (IoT) platform, to iPhone and iPad. The two companies unveiled a new Predix software development kit (SDK) for iOS, which gives developers the tools to make their own powerful industrial IoT apps." More info https://www.apple.com/newsroom/2017/10/apple-and-ge-partner-to-bring-predix-industrial-apps-to-iphone-and-ipad/
  9. IoT and STEM Outreach

    Yes, agree with pretty much all that. I would tend not to be too dismissive of the value of learning the principles of coding. At my daughter's age, the concepts of IF/THEN constructs and all the other coding principles are all very new and worthwhile I think. And primarily at this stage, I think my aim is just to get her enthusiastic about learning, so the scratch level programs have been great and she still has some way to run with it. However, I take your point that she will pretty quickly run out of runway to learn with just coding which is why I am already thinking about what next. Your point about teachers asking what will you drop is very valid. They don't teach this stuff in normal school time for that very reason. However, as a parent I have oodles of after school time and holidays to fill which I would like to be as enriching as possible, hence my interest in this. I'm not actually particularly focused on coding or even STEM. However, I did attend a DATA 61 event where one of the keynote speakers was 9 years old and was a little blown away by the potential of young people to create a future using data. As you say, its what you do with the data rather than coding as a skill that will make the difference. However, I think understanding how to manipulate data via coding will be \ a modern day skill that should sit alongside other skills like literacy and mathematics. But how to develop it over time in a reasonable fashion? I put up a proposal in EA about a year ago to launch a STEM Outreach Community, whereby deliverers of STEM education services such as yourself could collaborate and learn from each other. It hasn't got traction yet but I remain hopeful. Cheers Tim
  10. AIIA IoT MER: The Smart Mining Conference

    See https://www.aiia.com.au/events/upcoming-events/south-australia-events2/southaustralia/the-smart-mining-conference
  11. Smart metering for water with the IoT

    At 12pm 10 October 2017, this community hosted a webinar will be held on Smart Metering for Water with the IoT. In the comments on this post are some of the questions asked by the audience. Feel free to respond to the questions directly. To post a question/comment you need to: (register and) logon to this community site in the top right hand corner Navigate to Forums > IoT Engineering and locate the post with name of the webinar
  12. Interesting news on how a computer manufacturer aims to get on the IoT bandwagon. http://www.theaustralian.com.au/business/technology/dell-bets-big-on-internet-of-things/news-story/892c8d8495756ab387e021579dba7f22
  13. Multiple media reports out that Vodafone has launched their NB-IoT network, with two clients to trial it. Limited geographic coverage around central Sydney and Melbourne with wider roll out next year. See https://www.itnews.com.au/news/vodafone-switches-on-nb-iot-network-475139
  14. IoT and STEM Outreach

    Hi Heath, Just followed up on your link. Well done you! MiniSparx sounds like a great initiative. Newcastle based only? Re Scratch, I don't think there is any issue with Scratch and the demise of the industry in the article you linked sounds more like a law of supply and demand issue. My 6.5yr daughter has done four days now on Scratch and has the basic concepts mastered. She still struggles with slight more complicated things. The main point is that she is using a computer screen to create things rather than just mindlessly watch YouTube videos. What it has make me think about is progression. By the time she is 9 or 10 she will be beyond basic programming stuff. What would be good is a pathway to progress kids through ever more challenging things such as robots and even the IoT stuff Chi Bihn Le talked about. Ideally this would extend over their entire schooling. I was actually imagining her graduating from highschool with a fully fledged ICT degree. Its not has crazy as it sounds because I'm continually amazed at my daughter's ability to absorb complex ideas and use the tools to create quite sophisticated aps and she is not yet seven. She is not particularly bright either. She just has what every young child has when the learning is fun. It also has to be affordable. I pay about $40 a day for normal school holiday activities at the local school after ours care. Admittedly that is cheap but I pay about $100 per day for the code camp stuff, so the temptation to leave her in there is great.
  15. Smart metering for water with the IoT

    You mentioned "new business models for the water industry". What are they?
  16. Smart metering for water with the IoT

    Can you easily instrument existing mechanical meters? What are the challenges involved? Answer transcribed from webinar response by Rian Sullings (WaterGroup P/L): In Australia there are roughly 24 million water meters. Coincidentally, a similar number to the population, so most houses have a couple of people in them, but then if you consider all the other buildings and infrastructure, it adds up to a similar number. The vast majority of those meters are mechanical. They have moving parts. They're similar to a clock. They've got a register (like a car odometer). The meters themselves are designed to last for 10 or 15 years in situ. They wear out over time. They become less accurate. It is possible to replace an entire water meter with a smart-enabled meter, but it's also possible to retrofit devices on to those mechanical meters to make use of the physical asset that's already sitting there and will likely sit there for years to come. Most of the mechanical meters that have been deployed in Australia for the past decade or two have a provision for a data output. I think the thinking was that, "We don't quite have the technology yet, but we know we will in the future, so let's put data outputs on all the mechanical meters." The most common way of extracting the data is by attaching a sensor into the meter. If you imagine the register, it's a number of dials and they rotate as the water flows through. On some of those dials there is a magnet and that magnet makes revolutions with the dials or gears. For example, every 10 litres that passes through the meter, a dial might make one full revolution, so then you can use a reed switch or a hall effect sensor to detect when the magnet is close to or further away from the sensor. Then you can count how many times the water meters turns over time. You can use data logging to timestamp that.
  17. Telstra's NB IoT network launched

    According to a CRN News report, Telstra has turned on its national IoT network. See https://www.crn.com.au/news/telstra-quietly-switches-on-internet-of-things-network-473757 I cant see any announcements of Telstra's website though. If you know any more please link in the comments. Meanwhile, Telstra has announced the first four IoT startups to to be supported by its Muru-D incubator. https://www.telstra.com.au/aboutus/media/media-releases/Telstra-announces-first-IoT-focused-cohort-with-muru-D-MEL1
  18. Opportunities in Big Data

    Description: The topic of Big Data presents many challenges but also new opportunities. The recent success of deep learning is an example of the latter, where big amounts of training data enable large artificial neural networks to achieve super-human performance on tasks such as object detection and classification. Forward-looking companies and organisations around the world are currently massively investing in this domain. In this seminar we will look at some relevant basic algorithmic concepts but also report on experiences and plans of our research team when navigating through a time that some people call the “Big Bang of Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning”. About the presenter: Stephan Chalup (Ph.D., Dipl.-Math.) is an Associate Professor at the University of Newcastle in Australia where he is leading the Interdisciplinary Machine Learning Research Group and the Newcastle Robotics Lab. He studied mathematics with neuroscience at the University of Heidelberg and received his Ph.D. in Computing Science from the Machine Learning Research Centre at Queensland University of Technology (QUT) in Brisbane in 2002. Over the past fifteen years he published over 90 research articles in areas such as artificial neural networks, machine learning and autonomous intelligent agents. He is on the editorial boards of several journals and has presented research seminars, for example, at Harbin Institute of Technology in China (HIT), at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) in Germany, and at The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in the USA. When: 5:30pm midday AEST (Sydney)
  19. See this report: https://www.arnnet.com.au/article/627814/sigfox-shows-20-cent-iot-wireless-module/?fp=2&fpid=1
  20. Opportunities in Big Data

    until
    Description: The topic of Big Data presents many challenges but also new opportunities. The recent success of deep learning is an example of the latter, where big amounts of training data enable large artificial neural networks to achieve super-human performance on tasks such as object detection and classification. Forward-looking companies and organisations around the world are currently massively investing in this domain. In this seminar we will look at some relevant basic algorithmic concepts but also report on experiences and plans of our research team when navigating through a time that some people call the “Big Bang of Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning”. About the presenter: Stephan Chalup (Ph.D., Dipl.-Math.) is an Associate Professor at the University of Newcastle in Australia where he is leading the Interdisciplinary Machine Learning Research Group and the Newcastle Robotics Lab. He studied mathematics with neuroscience at the University of Heidelberg and received his Ph.D. in Computing Science from the Machine Learning Research Centre at Queensland University of Technology (QUT) in Brisbane in 2002. Over the past fifteen years he published over 90 research articles in areas such as artificial neural networks, machine learning and autonomous intelligent agents. He is on the editorial boards of several journals and has presented research seminars, for example, at Harbin Institute of Technology in China (HIT), at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) in Germany, and at The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in the USA.
  21. until
    Recording: This webinar has now passed. Members of Engineers Australia can view the recording for free on MyPortal. Logon and navigate to Industry Specific Applications > Utilities. Others can purchase the recording on EABooks. Title: Smart metering for water with the Internet of Things Presenters: Rian Sullings, Manager Smart Metering and IoT, WaterGroup What you will learn: How IoT is revolutionising the water industry How to fast-track IoT implementations Key challenges in adopting IoT and how to overcome them Description: The application internet of things technologies to high water users is delivering significant results, as evidenced by WaterGroup receiving awards for the highest impact of IoT technologies to date. The company has developed low cost, high volume remote sensing devices using new low power wide area communication technologies and advanced data analytics to develop new business models for the management of water use. Users are more easily able to identify water leaks and consumption trends, to generate insights and facilitate smarter action. About the presenter: Rian Sullings helps people understand their utility resource use to improve efficiency and reduce costs with the latest IoT tools and business models. With a key focus on the adoption of new technologies, Rian has been instrumental in the successful adoption of smart metering and remote sensing by some of Australia’s largest utilities and water users. Some of his achievements include the successful delivery of millions of dollars of water saving IoT projects for organisations such as QANTAS, Coles, Sydney Water, Honeywell, and the Department of Education, as well as the development of the first Sigfox enabled smart water metering device outside Europe and North America. When: 12 midday in Sydney. If you are in a state with a different time zone from NSW, please determine your local time. The date is above. The presentation will last 30 minutes followed by question time. Where: The presentation is by webinar. After registering you will be sent details of how to logon. Cost: This presentation is free to members of Engineers Australia (EA), the Australian Computer Society (ACS), the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) and IEEE. Just provide your membership number during registration for the event. The cost for non-members is $30. How to register: Please register on the Engineers Australia event system, link above. Note, to register you need to have a free EA ID which you can get on the first screen of the registration page. Take note of your ID number for future events.
  22. Sensors and Embedded Systems

    Types of sensors Sensors can measure virtually anything. Examples include GPS, moisture, water levels, tank levels, carbon dioxide, volatile organic hydrocarbons, particulates, radiant temperature, temperature, wind speed sensors and more. In addition to measuring specific attributes, there are other kinds of inputs to IoT systems such as machine vision. Applications of sensors with IoT connectivity are wide, including smart metering of utilities such as water and electricity. Interfacing sensors to an IoT system Sensors, at a very basic level, are inputs to an IoT system. Sensors typically physically interface with IoT system using a communication bus such as I²C, serial and USB, 0-10 V or 4-20 mA using. These systems use sensors and electrical contacts that have been around a long time so all the normal considerations with conventional sensors apply for IoT. For example, the digital signals from contact closures need to have debounce protection. Similarly, outputs from an IoT system may be digital or analogue and will interface to actuators that make changes to things, such as opening or closing of gates, opening or closing valves, switching pumps etc, often using electrical or solid state relays. Again there are well known things that needs to be addressed, such as the characteristics of the load including the voltage, the current, whether it is an inductive load. Sensors typically interface with RF modules, which have analogue and digital I/O pins. Many RF modules also have optional integrated microprocessor. RF modules also require an antenna connection. One challenge of IoT systems is discovering where the IoT devices are on a network. A key technology for addressing this is the W3C's Semantic Sensor Networks. Cost and power limitations of sensor communications for IoT The cost and power requirements of communications technologies can limit the amount of sensors deployed in IoT solutions. Many communications technologies used for IoT, such as wifi, are power hungry. Others, like satellite, are expensive. Low power solutions are emerging, including the Sigfox low power wide area (LPWA) network. Aggregating sensors in an array around a user terminal for satellite communications can reduce the power and cost of satellite communications for IoT applications, by eliminating the need for a dedicated uplink and downlink for each sensor. Visualisation of IoT sensor data Technologies such as augmented reality can be used to provide a visual display of IoT sensor data overlaid on the physical device which is updated live in the cloud for 'in context' visualisation of device data. Hardware The following diagram gives a representation of the architecture of a typical deployed Thing. In many cases you typically have a single sensor, a single actuator and battery storage, but when you generalise a Thing to a slightly higher level the following elements may all be represented. The sensors and actuators shown above are just a few examples. They will interface to an intelligence in a micro-controller via, typically via an interface of some sort. The microcontroller would typically be a system on chip with thousands of options. Ultimately the microcontroller is responsible for communicating via an interface which could be low power Wide Area Networks among other communication options. In addition to designing an IoT device from scratch, it is also possible to buy a single board computer such as Raspberry Pi and configure this for use in many IoT contexts. Firmware Firmware is the software on the microcontroller embedded into the Thing. The following diagram presumes a typical configuration of one or more sensors and one or more actuators with input and output drivers that communicate with a network. All this is managed by an operating system. At the simplest level there is a master polling loop microcontroller architecture but typically the more advanced microcontrollers available are running RTOS which give you a high level of sophistication. Linux is also a possibility and Contiki is often tied to 6LoWPAN communications. The structure of the firmware includes input and output drivers, middleware that takes the information and converts it via an applications programme, interfaced to some form that the business logic of the device can decide what to do with that information. That can include communications up via the network or control commands from the network. It can also include local logic operations that relay input drivers or input devices and sensors to output drivers that drive actuators so you can have local control functions standalone from the network. The firmware includes a communications driver to interface with the communications device be it a radio or a UART etc. Behind that is a communications protocol stack. For example, for a Bluetooth low energy or for 6LoWPAN the communications must be managed in terms of the packet payload encapsulation, and the various layers in the communications protocol. An important aspect that's sometimes overlooked is the connection manager. The purpose of the connection manager is to establish the network communications and to then monitor and manage that. If the communication drops out it must re-establish communications. It typically to include some form of health heartbeat, so even when the Thing is not reporting data, the device is telling the server that it is alive and happy. Conversely you could have a ping from the network down to the Thing so that the Thing knows it has the necessary connectivity to fulfil it's part in the IoT system. Overlaid on top of all of these software layers is energy management, that applies top to bottom in terms of how much energy we use for communicating with our sensors and actuators, how much energy is used for communications traffic and how much is consumed by the logical processing functions of the device. Another overlay top to bottom is having the appropriate security at the network level and then appropriate integrity in all of the processing layers. Design Considerations In terms of your typical Thing, we're really talking about standalone battery powered devices, so we need energy storage and desirably some form of external source into that, or it may be a self-contained primary cell. It's paramount that we carefully manage the energy. You'll hear power management tools often mentioned in IoT but it's not actually power we're trying to manage, it's energy. How many transmissions or sensing operations can we get out of the Thing, per day, per week, per month, and how many years will that battery last while performing that function. Getting that equation right is absolutely critical to having a practical thing. So an early starting point in considering the design of a Thing is to look at the energy budget over the life-cycle of the device and of its internal energy storage. A design decision must be made on whether to select a RF and microprocessor combination module or a separate module for each function. A particular application might require microprocessor specifications that are not met by an integrated microprocessor. Or, it might be cheaper to implement intelligence on a separate microprocessor rather than paying the difference in cost between the RF module, and the combination RF module with an integrated the CPU. It is hard to hard to separate sensor selection and the design of embedded electronics from consideration of the communication technologies available. The regulatory maximum power level for all "things" is at at the usual 920 MHz is one watt, which is 30 dBm. A key influencing factor is the receiver’s sensitivity. The various communication technologies vary in their sensitivity (e.g. Bluetooth is 90 dBm. Zigbee is typically -100 dBm).LoRa can be up to 138 dBm which is why they are suited to the applications requiring long range. They can get distances of up to 15 kilometers. The reason for that is they've got three bandwidths. There's seven spread factors, giving normal bit rates from 290 bits per second up to 37 1/2 kilobits per second. Other design considerations include the choice of antenna and the range of radio frequency (RF) considerations that must be taken into account, to ensure any IoT device is compliant with Australian regulations and the system will work as intended in the deployment environment. Another consideration is to determine if the data needs to be encrypted, typically using the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) and the associated security considerations. Power budgets must also be taken into account, especially where battery operation is required. What data rate is required and how much power will that use? Is there an option for recharging. What battery options are available for the device package and budget. These questions can affect the design or choice of sensing devices and embedded electrics dramatically. Another design consideration is the level of uncertainty which may be introduced by the context, or environment, in which the sensor is used, and whether its performance will vary over time. This is discussed further in the section on design thinking for IoT. Sources: Material on this page has primarily been sourced from the following: Presentation by Phillip Lark, Engineering Manager, Braetec titled Front End Integration: Connecting sensors to the cloud Webinar titled Satellites and the new industrial frontier – how new space technology is intersecting with the Internet of Things by Flavia Tata Nardina, Co-founder and CEO, Fleet Space Technologies
  23. Transforming businesses in a digital world

    The University of Technology Sydney is offering a 5-day industry short course “Transforming businesses in a digital world” - more information in the attached pdf below. The course helps put IoT in the context of business strategy. It starts on 13 October and is spread over 4 weeks to 12 November. The course is designed for business leaders and managers who are required to identify and drive business opportunities and disruption in the new digital world, enabled by IoT technologies. The course as targeted at high achievers and executives who would gain from apply practical methods for transforming their organisation’s business operation, as well as developing an alumni of fellow students and industry presenters. Frank Zeichner, CEO of the IoT Alliance Australian and Director of the Knowledge Economy Institute will be co-delivering the course together with 7 other industry leaders. Courtesy of the Applied IoT Engineering Community leader Geoff Sizer being a member of the course advisory board, Engineers Australia members are being offered a 10% discount on the advertised course price of $4,600 by entering the following coupon code during registration: DIGITALEA Prospective students can register for the course through the link below: https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/transforming-businesses-in-a-digital-world-tickets-36848395543 20909 UTS - Transforming businesses in a digital world - Short Course.pdf
  24. IoT and STEM Outreach

    Well done Chi, Hats off to you. We need more things like this for school holiday programs. I have just enrolled my daughter in a coding camp for two days but they just create games. Something like this is much more real world. Tim
  25. Recording: This webinar has now passed. Members of Engineers Australia can access the recording for free on MyPortal. Navigate to IoT Technologies / Communication Technologies. Non-members can purchase the recording on the EABooks website. Title: Satellites and the new industrial frontier – how new space technology is intersecting with the Internet of Things Presenter: Flavia Tata Nardina, Co-founder and CEO, Fleet Space Technologies What you will learn: How miniaturisation is driving a new generation of satellite technologies Practical applications of nanosatellites Key elements required to create industrial solutions leveraging space technology Description: Outer space and terrestrial industries may seem light years apart, but new space technology is about to change that. Nanosatellite technology is rapidly approaching practical application as a disruptive new option for ubiquitous internet connectivity and efficiency, powering the new wave of industrial applications powered by the Internet of Things. From farms to factories, and shipping to mining, satellites have unique advantages for connecting sensors in remote locations or for tracking applications across wide geographical distributions. In a world of globalised supply chains, this technology is being seen as a game changer. However, end to end solutions are still evolving and required to enable large-scale deployment of low-cost solutions. Fleet Space Technologies is launching the first two of a 100 satellites constellation at the beginning of 2018. It will provide a global backhaul service for the Internet of Things. This presentation will cover Fleets activities to date and discusses the practical applications of the technology for engineers. About the presenter: Flavia Tata Nardini began her career at the European Space Agency as Propulsion Test Engineer. She then joined TNO – the Netherlands Organisation for applied scientific research – to work on advanced space propulsion projects. In 2015, Flavia co-founded Fleet, a connectivity company set to maximise the resource efficiency of human civilisation. When: 12 midday Sydney time on 12 September 2016. The presentation will last 30 minutes followed by question time. Where: The presentation is by webinar. After registering you will be sent details of how to logon. Cost: This presentation is free to members of Engineers Australia (EA), the Australian Computer Society (ACS), the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) and IEEE. Just provide your membership number during registration for the event. The cost for non-members is $30. How to register: Please register on the Engineers Australia event system. Note, to register you need to have a free EA ID which you can get on the first screen of the registration page. Take note of your ID number for future events.
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