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Tim Kannegieter

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Tim Kannegieter last won the day on August 28

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  1. Telstra's NB IoT network launched

    According to a CRN News report, Telstra has turned on its national IoT network. See https://www.crn.com.au/news/telstra-quietly-switches-on-internet-of-things-network-473757 I cant see any announcements of Telstra's website though. If you know any more please link in the comments. Meanwhile, Telstra has announced the first four IoT startups to to be supported by its Muru-D incubator. https://www.telstra.com.au/aboutus/media/media-releases/Telstra-announces-first-IoT-focused-cohort-with-muru-D-MEL1
  2. until
    This webinar is an activity of EA’s Applied IoT Engineering Community. See http://iot.engineersaustralia.org.au/ for more information. Title: Smart metering for water with the Internet of Things Presenters: Rian Sullings, Manager Smart Metering and IoT, WaterGroup What you will learn: How IoT is revolutionising the water industry How to fast-track IoT implementations Key challenges in adopting IoT and how to overcome them Description: The application internet of things technologies to high water users is delivering significant results, as evidenced by WaterGroup receiving awards for the highest impact of IoT technologies to date. The company has developed low cost, high volume remote sensing devices using new low power wide area communication technologies and advanced data analytics to develop new business models for the management of water use. Users are more easily able to identify water leaks and consumption trends, to generate insights and facilitate smarter action. About the presenter: Rian Sullings helps people understand their utility resource use to improve efficiency and reduce costs with the latest IoT tools and business models. With a key focus on the adoption of new technologies, Rian has been instrumental in the successful adoption of smart metering and remote sensing by some of Australia’s largest utilities and water users. Some of his achievements include the successful delivery of millions of dollars of water saving IoT projects for organisations such as QANTAS, Coles, Sydney Water, Honeywell, and the Department of Education, as well as the development of the first Sigfox enabled smart water metering device outside Europe and North America. When: 12 midday in Sydney. If you are in a state with a different time zone from NSW, please determine your local time. The date is above. The presentation will last 30 minutes followed by question time. Where: The presentation is by webinar. After registering you will be sent details of how to logon. Cost: This presentation is free to members of Engineers Australia (EA), the Australian Computer Society (ACS), the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) and IEEE. Just provide your membership number during registration for the event. The cost for non-members is $30. How to register: Please register on the Engineers Australia event system, link above. Note, to register you need to have a free EA ID which you can get on the first screen of the registration page. Take note of your ID number for future events.
  3. Transforming businesses in a digital world

    The University of Technology Sydney is offering a 5-day industry short course “Transforming businesses in a digital world” - more information in the attached pdf below. The course helps put IoT in the context of business strategy. It starts on 13 October and is spread over 4 weeks to 12 November. The course is designed for business leaders and managers who are required to identify and drive business opportunities and disruption in the new digital world, enabled by IoT technologies. The course as targeted at high achievers and executives who would gain from apply practical methods for transforming their organisation’s business operation, as well as developing an alumni of fellow students and industry presenters. Frank Zeichner, CEO of the IoT Alliance Australian and Director of the Knowledge Economy Institute will be co-delivering the course together with 7 other industry leaders. Courtesy of the Applied IoT Engineering Community leader Geoff Sizer being a member of the course advisory board, Engineers Australia members are being offered a 10% discount on the advertised course price of $4,600 by entering the following coupon code during registration: DIGITALEA Prospective students can register for the course through the link below: https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/transforming-businesses-in-a-digital-world-tickets-36848395543 20909 UTS - Transforming businesses in a digital world - Short Course.pdf
  4. IoT and STEM Outreach

    Well done Chi, Hats off to you. We need more things like this for school holiday programs. I have just enrolled my daughter in a coding camp for two days but they just create games. Something like this is much more real world. Tim
  5. Recording: This webinar has now passed. Members of Engineers Australia can access the recording for free on MyPortal. Navigate to IoT Technologies / Communication Technologies. Non-members can purchase the recording for $30 on the EABooks website. Title: Satellites and the new industrial frontier – how new space technology is intersecting with the Internet of Things Presenter: Flavia Tata Nardina, Co-founder and CEO, Fleet Space Technologies What you will learn: How miniaturisation is driving a new generation of satellite technologies Practical applications of nanosatellites Key elements required to create industrial solutions leveraging space technology Description: Outer space and terrestrial industries may seem light years apart, but new space technology is about to change that. Nanosatellite technology is rapidly approaching practical application as a disruptive new option for ubiquitous internet connectivity and efficiency, powering the new wave of industrial applications powered by the Internet of Things. From farms to factories, and shipping to mining, satellites have unique advantages for connecting sensors in remote locations or for tracking applications across wide geographical distributions. In a world of globalised supply chains, this technology is being seen as a game changer. However, end to end solutions are still evolving and required to enable large-scale deployment of low-cost solutions. Fleet Space Technologies is launching the first two of a 100 satellites constellation at the beginning of 2018. It will provide a global backhaul service for the Internet of Things. This presentation will cover Fleets activities to date and discusses the practical applications of the technology for engineers. About the presenter: Flavia Tata Nardini began her career at the European Space Agency as Propulsion Test Engineer. She then joined TNO – the Netherlands Organisation for applied scientific research – to work on advanced space propulsion projects. In 2015, Flavia co-founded Fleet, a connectivity company set to maximise the resource efficiency of human civilisation. When: 12 midday Sydney time on 12 September 2016. The presentation will last 30 minutes followed by question time. Where: The presentation is by webinar. After registering you will be sent details of how to logon. Cost: This presentation is free to members of Engineers Australia (EA), the Australian Computer Society (ACS), the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) and IEEE. Just provide your membership number during registration for the event. The cost for non-members is $30. How to register: Please register on the Engineers Australia event system. Note, to register you need to have a free EA ID which you can get on the first screen of the registration page. Take note of your ID number for future events.
  6. Cisco acquires Springpath

    On the same day as Cisco announced major upgrades to its Spark product, it also announced its intent to purchase Springpath to bolster its data centre business. This is all part of a general trend for the company to move toward more software services, bridging the gap into IoT. For an analysis by media read: https://channellife.com.au/story/cisco-acquire-hyperconverged-software-vendor-springpath-us320m-deal/
  7. Platforms

    Introduction We need a page that describes the huge range of "IoT platforms". What is a platform? What are the different classes of platforms? What is the general purpose of each? Perhaps links to a directory of providers in each class. e.g. Reekoh is a platform focused on integrating large business system like Salesforce, Microsoft, Oracle, etc. The aim is to provide enterprises with a way to create IoT services. They have a plug and play marketplace idea where as you log into their system, you literally buy the plug-ins that you need. Then, you start to connect services together so you could connect your assets within your building to your Salesforce platform etc
  8. IoT startups

    Introduction An IoT startup is a technically-lead small business that typically has yet to define its business model. Startups usually try several different routes to market prior to settling on an approach that has a good market fit. A key early goal for IoT startups is to identify the problem that is being solved by the use of IoT technology. The problem also has to be big enough for organisations to justify investing in a solution. Once a problem has been identified, the startup describes their hypothesis and identifies assumptions and risks. The next phase is to plan and test, building something simple to test the assumptions. Results are analysed and the hypothesis re-evaluated, and so on in a spiral fashion until a final business model is proven. The above process can be an emotional roller coaster, with many peaks and troughs. Peaks can be associated with initial excitement around an idea, seeing prototypes working, interest from a potential customer, obtaining funding etc. Troughs are associated with the realisation that its not as easy as first thought, mistakes, lost customer opportunities, cashflow crunches, realisation of a lack of skills, etc. Other challenges include decisions around quitting a day job etc. Individuals who launch or lead the establishment of new businesses are often described as entrepreneurs. Entrepreneurs need to have a certain amount of resilience to cope with the above challenges. They also need a lot of energy and self-motivation. There is a huge amount of literature around innovation generally and the Lean Startup methodology has found favour in recent times. This includes concepts such as minimum viable product to test ideas before committing further. A whole industry has grown up around support for technology led start ups. This include business accelerators/incubators and a range of investment companies ranging from seed/early stage angel groups, equity crowdfunding and late stage venture capital. These organisations often host several startups that share technical and business system resources. IoT specific challenges Startups in the IoT space is more challenging that other fields because it requires a combination of hardware, software and business models. Technical challenges that need to be addressed during business planning include consideration of the full range of technologies and practices outlined in this wiki. In addition, there are a number of national inhibitors/enablers of the entire IoT industry in Australia which really need to be addressed in order to foster more IoT Startups, illustrated below: Source: A report commissioned by the Communications Alliance Australia on Enabling the Internet of Things for Australia For example, it is currently difficult to deliver IoT led innovation in the healthcare sector due to the very high number of regulatory barriers that must be cleared. Similarly, the smart city concept is difficult to address due to the highly fragmented nature of efforts around this area. Links The following organisations are encouraging IoT Startups in Australia: The IoT Alliance Australia has a workstream on Startups and Innovation. The Australian government supports the IoT Ecosystem, e.g. Thinxtra obtained funding to roll out its Sigfox LPWAN network Sources: The information on this page was primarily sourced from the following: A webinar titled Your brilliant idea! Technology start-ups dissected by Stuart Waite, CEO, Timpani
  9. Thinxtra has obtained a $10 million in funding from the Australian government See http://www.cefc.com.au/media/files/energy-efficiency-benefits-as-cefc-helps-thinxtra-scale-up-its-network-for-the-internet-of-things.aspx and http://www.environment.gov.au/minister/frydenberg/media-releases/mr20170817a.html and https://www.thinxtra.com/2017/08/cornerstone_investor_cefc/ This has been reported as the government taking a 15% equity stake in the business.
  10. Enterprise Resource Planning

    Introduction The internet of things can be a key enabler of improvements in enterprise resource planning (ERP). Enterprises that produce products of any sorts aspire to shorter product runs, more agility in implementing design changes, faster deliver to market, flexibility in packaging and distribution, better forecasting / supply chain management, improved product traceability and feedback from end users. However, despite decades of experience with ERP systems many organisations still take orders by emailed pdf which is entered manually into an enterprise resource planning system. The IoT and ERP IoT data of use in ERP systems is as varied as the context of application, but may relate to: Quantity Quality Machine status, faults and their causes.
  11. Intellectual Property

    Introduction A particular challenge that may affect the development and implementation of IoT systems in commercial settings is consideration of intellectual property rights. This is primarily the case in the case of new IoT enabled products being developed for market, particularly if exporting, but also for innovations in business or engineering processes enabled by the IoT that organisation are investing large amounts of money in. Intellectual property rights are typically protected by obtaining patents and often this is considered a prerequisite to obtain funding from venture capitalists and the like. Having a patent provides leverage in business negotiations and disputes, prevents others from copying your innovation, and can provide licencing revenues. A key reason to consider intellectual property rights is to have freedom to operate. Because IoT is new, many people and organisations world-wide are applying for patents. Organisations developing or implementing IoT system may inadvertently infringe the rights of others and huge upfront investments may be forfeited when challenged. This can be avoided by careful patent infringement searches prior to the investment phase. When patents of concern are discovered they can be carefully analysed by a patent attorney to determine if they do actually constrain your activity. If the patent does restrict your activity, it may be possible to work around the issue by obtaining a licence or coming to some other commercial arrangement. Obtaining patents in the computer technology space is difficult and many patents, when challenged, are found to be invalid. So if you receive a notice of patent infringement, a patent lawyer should be consulted to determine if the patent is valid before caving in to any unreasonable demands. Basics of IP A patentable an invention must be: New; and Not be obvious to someone with knowledge and experience in the subject Not disclosed by publication or otherwise Is useful No prior secret commercial use Just connecting a thing that has never been internet-enabled before is unlikely to be patentable. Rather, inventions need to be something that makes the IoT device work and is truly a new improvement in technology. Good IP Practices A key focus in any innovative work is to ensure you own the patent. Ownership of the invention originates with the inventor but under common law flows to the employer when the invention was made in the normal course of their duties to the employer. It's important to have this clarified when employing contractors to support the innovative work, particularly if this includes the provision of software and systems that involve the integration of systems from multiple suppliers. Non-disclosure agreements should be standard in any discussions with third parties. In practice IoT product developers need to make a decision whether to protect their work through secrecy or to apply for a patent. Secrecy is paramount in any case, during the period leading up to a patent application, to ensure it remains valid. However, it may be commercially sensible to simply maintain the secrecy of the invention, particularly given that the costs of obtaining patents are not inconsiderable, particularly if applying world-wide. Sources: Information on this page was primarily obtained from the following sources: A webinar titled Dodging Dragons and Catching Unicorns by Justin Blows, Phoenix Intellectual Property
  12. Test: Introduction to IoT

    This is a recording of a webinar delivered by Geoff Sizer.
  13. Recording: The webinar has now passed. Members of Engineers Australia can access the recording for free on MyPortal. Navigate to IoT Technologies / Interoperability. Non-members can purchase the recording for $30 on the EABooks website. This webinar is an activity of EA’s Applied IoT Engineering Community. See http://iot.engineersaustralia.org.au/ for more information. Title: An Open Source approach to the Internet of Things Presenter: Prem Prakash Jayaraman, Research Fellow, Department of Computer Science and Software Engineering, Swinburne University of Technology What you will learn: • Challenges in the design and development of an open architecture for developing IoT solutions • Introduction to OpenIoT • How to use this platform to integrate, discover, query and visualise IoT sensors and data Description: This presentation provides an overview of the challenges in developing IoT architectures with a focus on an open source IoT platform called OpenIoT which is a middleware infrastructure supporting flexible configuration and deployment of algorithms for collection, and filtering information streams stemming from internet-connected objects, while at the same time generating and processing business/applications events. The presentation will demonstrate some of the capabilities of this platform including the ability to integrate any sensors platform, provide a do-it-yourself interface to discover IoT sensors, compose queries and visualise the IoT sensor data. About the presenter: Prem was previously a Post Doctoral Research Scientist in the Digital Productivity and Services Flagship of Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO – Australian Government’s Premier Research Agency). He is broadly interested in the emerging areas of Distributed Systems in particular Internet of Things (IoT), Mobile computing and Cloud Computing. He was a key contributor and one of the architects of the Open Source Internet of Things project (OpenIoT) that has won the prestigious Black Duck Rookie of the Year Award in 2013. In the past 5 years, Prem has worked on several industry-funded IoT projects in multiple sectors including agriculture, future manufacturing and smart cities. When: 12 midday AEST (Sydney) on 15 August 2017. The presentation will last 30 minutes followed by question time. Where: The presentation is by webinar. After registering you will be sent details of how to logon. Cost: This presentation is free to members of Engineers Australia (EA), the Australian Computer Society (ACS), the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) and IEEE. Just provide your membership number during registration for the event. The cost for non-members is $30. How to register: Please register on the Engineers Australia event system. Note, to register you need to have a free EA ID which you can get on the first screen of the registration page. Take note of your ID number for future events.
  14. Apparently this new platform called Hyperledger Fabric 1.0should be useful for industrial IoT applications. I dont fully understand how this works or applies in IoT, but would welcome comment and examples. https://www.hyperledger.org/announcements/2017/07/11/hyperledger-announces-production-ready-hyperledger-fabric-1-0
  15. Blockchain

    Introduction Blockchain is a relatively new technology that underpins transactional applications such as those associated with cyrpto currencies like Bitcoin. In essence, all transactions in a blockchain are added as blocks in a linear, chronological order by a node or computer connected to the blockchain, providing a complete and accurate recording. Transactions are enabled using a private and public key. The technology protects against the tampering and revision of data records, helping create trust, accountability and transparency as well as streamlining business processes. The adoption of blockchain has primarily been in the financial sectors. The application in IoT has been hyped by a number of vendors because it is seen as a potential solution to the perennial concerns about IoT security, particularly in controlling botnet attacks because it can potentially prevent hijacked devices from being used in denial of service attacks or otherwise disrupting its environment. Blockchain technology is built for decentralised control meaning there is no master computer controlling the entire chain. Rather, each node in the network have a copy of the chain. So is seen as less vulnerable and more scaleable than traditional security approaches. The distributed nature of the technology helps remove single points of failure. It also lends itself to the IoT potential for massive numbers of things being interconnected across different networks, without the need for centralised cloud servers. Potentially, blockchain could also enable the monetisation of data, where owners of IoT sensors could sell data for digital currency (e.g. see tileplay) Potential industrial application Blockchain is a way of creating digital assets, or tokenising a thing, that can then be transferred or traded. Virtually anything of value can be tokenised, e.g. eco-credits, work-hours, rights to buy products/services, commodities, electricity etc. For example the energy produced by rooftop solar or any other energy source, could generate income in the form of cryptocurrency that is registered on the blockchain. Having established a large blockchain, it would then be possible to form secondary markets for trading of these digital assets as you can assign owners of these assets. It is also being seen as a way of ensuring trusted readings from sensors in areas such as drug safety, food quality and other certification processes, anywhere where the end-user or regulator needs to be assured of a immutable record of the conditions monitored. Blockchain is also "public", which means everyone participating in the chain can see the transactions stored in them, while the cryptographic algorithms underpinning it also provides greater data security against hackers. One of the biggest areas of potential industrial application to streamline supply chain processes in many sectors. Global supply chains obviously have a very large number of transactions and have massively complicated, and arguably bloated, computational systems to handle and secure them. Blockchain would help provenance, by tracking objects throughout the supply chain while enabling line-of-credit contracts and incremental payments. Every physical thing in a supply chain could have a digital passport, that proves authenticity - things like existence, origin, condition, location. It also enables "smart contracts" However, while there has been much excitement over blockchain, its application is still embryonic. The technology Blockchains are a distributed ledger technology, which is a peer-to-peer, insert only datastore that uses consensus to synchronise cyrptographically secured data. The Peer-to-peer (P2P) component partitions tasks or work loads between peers or nodes. Peers are equally privileged in the application. Insert only datastores can only create and read data, not update or delete data. A key challenge in internet enabled systems is to build a consensus on what is to be trusted. The consensus problem involves determining ways of facilitating isolated computing processes to agree on something, when some of them may be faulty. Faults can be benign, such as when a node goes down and is just unresponsive. However, faults can also be hostile where actors are trying to fool the system and this needs to be protected against. There are a large number of mechanisms to deliver consensus including proof of stake, proof of work, federated consensus, round robin, proprietary distributed ledger, etc. Application considerations and limitations While blockchain offers the potential for application in IoT, it is by no means certain it will be taken up. Its application in financial sectors is relatively simple compared to the requirements of device authentication, security and control layers. In particular, if 51% of processing power in an blockchain network were subverted, and this is possible in many small IoT networks, an attacker could change the supposedly secure data records. A key limitation is that blockchain is computationally intensive and many IoT devices lack the processing power to participate in a blockchain without compromising the required speed. Also, because every record is stored and never deleted, the ledger in any blockchain will grow continuously and this needs to be stored in every node. While the public nature of blockchains is one of it's key advantages, it also generates a limitation in that data is not likely to be private. So commercially sensitive data should not be shared, although researchers are working on methods to get around this. Researchers and commercial vendors around the world are working on feasible models to apply in the IoT space, e.g: UNSW: Blockchain for IoT Security and Privacy: The Case Study of a Smart Home Researchers are working on simplified computational methods to make it feasible for IoT. However, commercial knowledge of blockchain is limited and combined with the lack of broadbased IoT engineering skills, widespread adoption seems to be someway off. Links: Hyperledger - A Linux Foundation Project Vendors Modum - data integrity for supply chain operations powered by blockchain Sources: Information on this page was primarily sourced from the following. A webinar titled Blockchain Technology by Nick Addison, Chief Technology Officer, Finhaus Labs
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