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    Introduction: Data Analytics has traditionally been associated with the processes involved in using data to inform decision making. It builds on the underpinning principles of data management that are required to build any kind of IT system, including the integration of IoT operational and back-end business systems. In the context of IoT, Data analytics encompasses many approaches including big data, in-memory computing, cloud computing, NoSQL databases, data integration, and interactive analytics, as shown in the diagram below. Diagram courtesy of Jorge Lizama. GHD Historically, data analytics took the form of Decision / Executive Support Systems starting in the 1970s, then evolving into Online Analytical Processing (OLAP), Business Intelligence (BI) in the 1990s. It is common to think of data analytics in terms of the volume, velocity, and variety of the data. Volume refers to the quantity of data, velocity to the speed at which the data is generated, and variety to the different types of data. Over the past few years, two new Vs, value and veracity have been introduced. Veracity refers to the quality of the data, and value refers to the benefit that the organisations can gain from the volume and variety of data that is being delivered with great velocity, if they are able to depend on its veracity. Diagram courtesy of Arthur Baoustanos, aib Consulting Services The current approach to managing data collected from IoT devices is to sense/observe the data, move it into the cloud, process and analyse it there, visualise it for decision making purposes (using technologies including augmented reality), then either store or discard it partially/completely. In recent times the exponential growth of data has created situations where "traditional" analytical methods are not viable and the term big data analytics is being used to describe new analytical techniques developed to cope with these situations. Big data analytics is often associated with IoT because many IoT applications involve large numbers of sensors generating large volumes of data. Also, many IoT applications involve the integration of a large variety of data formats such as weather data, machine vision and the like. A key challenge of IoT systems that generate or integrate a lot of data is how to make sense of it and how best to make use of it. This is driving the uptake of cognitive computing systems that assist analysts in determining insights and drive outcomes not possible with traditional analysis. Planning for data analytics The critical questions that organisations will need to answer when embarking on the journey to advanced data analytics are: Where does the organisation want to go (goals)? How will we get there? What do we need to get there? Will our current structure allows us to get there? What changes do I need to make to get us there? It is important to start with the business objective: define critical business issues and decide where value will be derived. Then evaluate which data is required to assess the identified issues and determine any gaps in relevant data. Be as specific as possible about what decisions the company will make based on that information. Departments and divisions within the organisation should collaborate to understand exactly what information is required to address common business goals. Data could also be purchased from outside sources to complement internal data collection. Once an organisation has decided to optimise their efficiency using data analytics, they should look at long as well as short term goals, and set specific efficiency or process change targets in order to get the most out of their investment as shown in the diagram below. Diagram courtesy of Umesh Bhutoria, EnergyTech Ventures A gap analysis of people skills (users, engineers, managers), data (points and frequency) and investment needed to reach goals should also be carried out, to ensure that all stakeholders are willing to see the process out through trials to implementation. When approaching vendors, care should be taken not to over- or under- specify requirements. For more information, visit the Project Management for IoT page. It may also be beneficial to invite shortlisted vendors to site to conduct data discovery tasks or solve smaller problems that will help determine if they will be a good fit to help the organisation implement a large-scale data analytic solution. Challenges Industry uses a small fraction of available data due to siloed data in legacy systems and leaders’ scepticism about the impact of technologies such as IoT. For example, added value for a commercial building could be derived from integration of available data into building management systems and building intelligence systems to perform energy analytics and management to improve efficiency, or condition monitoring and predictive maintenance. Three factors which contribute to the slow uptake of IoT data analytics in industry are: multiple data points (including electrical, thermal and mechanical energy, as well as process and production data) which may be housed in separate servers proprietary or inflexible data collection and storage solutions which are difficult to integrate skills gaps in staff and management in understanding the benefits of data analytics Types of solutions There are several different models of IoT data analytics solutions as shown in the diagram below. Diagram courtesy of Umesh Bhutoria, EnergyTech Ventures A stand-alone system could involve purchasing metres or sensors and asking a vendor to integrate them. This model has the potential to be influenced by the vendor rather than the user organisation’s requirement and does not provide integration with existing data. The second model, data as a service, provides monitoring and automated reports, but will not necessarily include integration with legacy data. Insights as a service is a model that is gaining in popularity, and is applicable to organisations with mature data infrastructure, who know what data is available and how the organisation aims to use it. It is typically a cloud-based service that uses company, user and third-party data to provide insights, as well as offering support in using these insights to meet the goals of the organisation. Existing data is also connected and centralised, as shown in the diagram below. Diagram courtesy of Umesh Bhutoria, EnergyTech Ventures The choice of solution should be based on the benefits it will bring to the organisation, weighed against the pre- and post- purchase effort, cost and ease and flexibility of use. The role of data analytics in IoT A non-exhaustive list of advanced data analytic applications within IOT applications is listed below. The majority of the applications listed revolve around the broad categories of asset management, planning, and performance management. The IOT has helped businesses to address these applications in a more holistic manner than was previously possible. Predictive maintenance Energy usage optimisation and energy analytics Downtime minimisation Network performance management Device performance effectiveness Load balancing optimisation Loss prevention Capacity planning Asset management and inventory tracking Demand forecasting Pricing optimisation Disaster planning and recovery Yield management Sources: The information on this page has been sourced primarily from the following: Webinar titled The data management perspective on IoT by Arthur Baoustanos, Managing Director, aib Consulting Services Case Study titled Studying movement behaviour in a building: A case study of obtaining analytics from IoT Data Webinar titled “The Data Indigestion Crisis: New approaches to Energy Analytics” by Umesh Bhtoria, Founder and CEO, EnergyTech Ventures
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    Recording: This webinar has now passed. Members of Engineers Australia can view the recording for free on MyPortal. Logon and navigate to Functions > Energy Management. Others can purchase the recording on EABooks. You can also view a list of all recordings. To be notified of upcoming webinars, register on this website and tick the newsletter box. Title: The Data Indigestion Crisis: New approaches to Energy Analytics Presenter: Umesh Bhutoria, Founder and CEO, Energytech Ventures Description: With billions of new sensors from the Internet of Things flooding organisations with data, coupled with cheap cloud storage and processing capacity, we are rapidly heading toward a data ingestion crisis. If organisations are to take advantage of the benefits of IoT, there needs to be a step change in the ability of engineers to take advantage of advanced analytics. However, there remains a lack of skilled resources and a bewildering variety of options in the solution stack (hardware + software + platform). In the energy analytics area, companies globally are expected to spend up to $4 billion annually in the manufacturing and utility sectors alone. However, they are also expected to only reap 30% of the potential value from their investments, due to poor identification and leveraging of actionable insights. As a result, it is expected that analytics as service will grow rapidly along with a range of business model innovations but organisations still need to understand what services they are procuring. This webinar aims to help prepare organisations to invest in data analytics by setting out the basics of the field and then addressing the massive changes taking place due to the Internet of Things. It will show how to get started, how to deal with vendors and how to bring people in your organisation along with you. The presentation will also include a number of energy analytics case studies, including from the textile industry in Asia. About the presenters: Umesh has over ten years’ experience in energy efficiency having worked with clients like the World Bank Group, IFC, Sweden Textile Water Initiative, Tat Motors, TERI, NALCO, Aditya Birla Group, SIDBI, Mardec, and Welspun across India, Bangladesh and Malaysia. He was the Energy Manager of the Year in 2013 for Energy Engineers India and was recognized for pathbreaking work in Energy Analytics in 2017 by AEE Western India Chapter. When: 12pm (NSW time) 17 April 2018. The presentation will last 30 minutes followed by 30 minutes question time. Where: The presentation by webinar Cost: This presentation is free to members of Engineers Australia (EA), the Australian Computer Society (ACS), the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) and IEEE. Just provide your membership number during registration for the event. The cost for non-members is $30. How to register: Please register on the Engineers Australia event system. Note, to register you need to have a free EA ID which you can get on the first screen of the registration page. Take note of your ID number for future events.
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    18 Oct "Apple and GE today announced a partnership to deliver powerful industrial apps designed to bring predictive data and analytics from Predix, GE’s industrial Internet of Things (IoT) platform, to iPhone and iPad. The two companies unveiled a new Predix software development kit (SDK) for iOS, which gives developers the tools to make their own powerful industrial IoT apps." More info https://www.apple.com/newsroom/2017/10/apple-and-ge-partner-to-bring-predix-industrial-apps-to-iphone-and-ipad/
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