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Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/19/2021 in all areas

  1. When all is said and done, there has usually been more said than done! This is surely true of the IoT. I agree with IoT’s promise, but see few of its practitioners. Much of the IoT hype talks about connecting the fridge to the stove, although why, I can’t imagine. Business cannot thrive without customers, and who are they in IoT land, once the Early Adopters have tired of its promise? I can claim some small expertise in this area, having successfully launched an On-Farm Internet-of Sensors system called Plexus three years ago, moving soil moisture and climate data using solar-powered mesh networks across the farm and up to a web-application in the cloud that allows farmers to access their irrigation data from anywhere, at any time. To break into this field required a huge investment of funds over three years, a multi-disciplinary approach that hauled together electronic, mechanical, communications and software engineers, plus external industrial design skills, a manufacturing link into China, all sorts of technical skills to set up the production line, and some thirty years of previous environmental measurements in the bush merely to battle-harden the troops. Then you have to sell it and keep it working until you’ve crossed the ‘valley of death’ between early adopters and the early majority. So the hard reality is that breaking into the whole IoT technological arena is non-trivial; it’s no place for the faint-of-heart or the weak-of-purse or the inexperienced-yet-hopeful. But it is fun, and at last, slightly lucrative. Dr Andrew Skinner FIEAust CPEng NER South Australian Professional Engineer of the Year, 2015
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  2. Hi Andrew, You and Geoff raise important points about successful IoT enterprises. Because this is an engineering and not a IOT business forum, my response is brief. I agree it is necessary: to understand the application and the underlying IoT technology have access to multidisciplinary skills, including engineering and design to focus on sales and marketing have a route to manufacture have a route to market involve capital partners if necessary The following may also be needed: a great business plan supported by a network of business advisers strategic intellectual property planning, including freedom to operate patent filing strategies (which may be to file nothing) I've started a blog on this site about IoT intellectual property strategy. Justin
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  3. Hi Andrew, the topic you raise is spot on, and is a core item I will address in my webinar on 5th July. The IoT when considered top-to-bottom - ie from the Cloud down to deloyed Things - encompasses just about every facet of ICT, software engineering and and electronics engineering. There are at least a dozen technology elements, each of which has a steep learing curve. And add to that the required knowledge of the system where IoT is to be applied. That said, many aspects of IoT technology are not new - just used in and integrated manner, often by engineers who are expert in the field where they wish to use IoT, but not in the actual IoT technologies themselves. One of the primary drivers for forming this community was the need to provide a means for those involved in IoT - both technology providers and technology adopters - to come together to help build critical mass.
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