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  1. Hi Geoff Three of us at MEA listened to your inaugural talk this morning on the IoT and thoroughly enjoyed it. You handled question time with panache and told us a few things we didn't know (SigFox - whatever that is - heading the list...) You also mentioned that folks likely to field a 'top-to-bottom' solution for an IoT application were still in the future, and likely to need a team of about 20 good folks to pull it off. Even counting our sales, marketing and administration folk - plus external industrial design and manufacturing support - brings us no-where near that num
    2 points
  2. Hi Andrew, the topic you raise is spot on, and is a core item I will address in my webinar on 5th July. The IoT when considered top-to-bottom - ie from the Cloud down to deloyed Things - encompasses just about every facet of ICT, software engineering and and electronics engineering. There are at least a dozen technology elements, each of which has a steep learing curve. And add to that the required knowledge of the system where IoT is to be applied. That said, many aspects of IoT technology are not new - just used in and integrated manner, often by engineers who are expert in the f
    2 points
  3. When all is said and done, there has usually been more said than done! This is surely true of the IoT. I agree with IoT’s promise, but see few of its practitioners. Much of the IoT hype talks about connecting the fridge to the stove, although why, I can’t imagine. Business cannot thrive without customers, and who are they in IoT land, once the Early Adopters have tired of its promise? I can claim some small expertise in this area, having successfully launched an On-Farm Internet-of Sensors system called Plexus three years ago, moving soil moisture and climate data usin
    1 point
  4. The IoT under the Microscope. Terror stalks the floor at MEA: Christmas is only a fortnight away and sales orders for our new CAT-M1 data loggers are raining down from above. But production has jammed: SD memory cards are failing to pass production testing and the engineer who designed this part of the circuitry is incommunicado somewhere in Europe. Our production engineer is going quietly mad with fear and frustration. I need to step in. It’s now 45 years since I graduated in electronic engineering from the South Australian Institute of Technology so these moments of
    1 point
  5. with LORA at least, that is what you need to do. However the LORA technology is cheap enough to install transmitters. Also the coverage in the bush will be further
    1 point
  6. Love it. All the idle cash in the world is desperate to not miss out on the next Airbnb, and has done a sensational job of monopolising the narrative of business success. Rocket speed growth, a trail of destruction, laptops in cafeterias, and more talking than doing. Let the trends be trends. There's no replacement for authenticity.
    1 point
  7. Hi Jason Thanks for your thoughtful advice on this matter. We have discussed this internally and believe that you have shown us a way forward. MEA will approach the various parties who own our weather station networks and discuss Creative Commons licences with them, while talking about how the data can be more broadly used for the good of all. No doubt there will be much discussion about 'fairness' and 'impartial' dealings between commercial competitors and so forth. We're OK with that. This is very fundamental issue for manufacturers of IoT technology, so your interes
    1 point
  8. The Dilemma of Data Ownership For more than three decades, MEA has built weather stations for wind, solar and agriculture applications within Australia. In the past decade, there has been a shift from private to public ownership, with many hundreds of MEA weather stations being deployed within networks across whole agricultural regions in southern Australia. These stations give farmers up-to-date access to local weather data via websites hosted by various Government or statuary authorities interested in water use efficiency in irrigated areas and among many other applications outside
    1 point
  9. Afterword What will be the fate of the early innovators in the IoT arena? Are they a doomed species, to be pushed into oblivion when the big money turns its attention to grabbing market share and blowing away or gobbling up all the small fry who have been trying to create differentiated toe-holds as markets mature? This is a question that bites pretty close to home for MEA. MEA is a 5-year old start-up with 33 years of experience. Any company with some sort of longevity is by definition one that has re-invented itself again and again over the course of its history - ma
    1 point
  10. To Mesh or Not Mesh – that’s the question! The burgeoning technology base beneath the Internet-of-Things (IoT) offers a plethora of possible technologies for shifting data (in MEA’s case) from on-farm monitoring systems to users. One of the central questions facing product developers in this field is whether or not to operate using ‘meshing’ technology. Within a meshed radio network, you get all these smart IoT-enabled devices to help each other out by passing data along a self-healing mesh network to get better coverage and more reliable data delivery. According to a rough
    1 point
  11. This post describes the core processes of the community, as illustrated in the following flow chart. The core functions of each role are as follows: a. Community Leader: i. Hosts core member meetings and sends meeting invites ii. Takes minutes and copies to Community Agenda Forum iii. Approves all webinars and other events iv. Champions any special community projects and obtains any resources required to deliver them v. Ensures good variety of activities and coordination of all other roles vi. Backs
    1 point
  12. The Chasm between Australian Industry and Science Much public hand-wringing has occurred in the past few years about Australia’s poor international rating when it comes to collaboration between our industry and our scientific bodies. During our IoT webinars, this curious snake-in-the-grass has reared its head in the same old way, suggesting that there remains a fundamental misunderstanding between the two camps. What really gets my goat are steamy statements from academia about how the growth of the IoT is dependent upon industry driving the cost of sensors and hardware down to
    1 point
  13. Question from 5-Jul Webinar: Do you feel it's more likely that enterprise will look to develop IoT development capabilities in house or rely on external consultancy? Answer: The technologies and engineering skills require to implement IoT system top-to-bottom are extensive, and it is unlikely that typical engineering teams using IoT in their systems or developing IoT-capable products will have the full range of required capabilities. Additionally, these skills are different from the core skills required to design and develop the primary functions of the system or product
    1 point
  14. Folks - I've lifted this 'sidebar' about our Plexus IoT development story from an application note I'm writing about powering IoT devices using solar energy. We named the product (in the photos above) - after the 'Solar Plexus' in the human body - two puns intended - is a mesh network delivering data from across the farm (where cellular access is not always present or reliable) via 2.4 GHz ZigBee radio. Hope you enjoy the story Andrew (at MEA) ‘Plexus’ - an On-farm Internet of Things Designing and operating an ‘Internet of Things’ on-farm requires a multi-disci
    1 point
  15. Hi Andrew, You and Geoff raise important points about successful IoT enterprises. Because this is an engineering and not a IOT business forum, my response is brief. I agree it is necessary: to understand the application and the underlying IoT technology have access to multidisciplinary skills, including engineering and design to focus on sales and marketing have a route to manufacture have a route to market involve capital partners if necessary The following may also be needed: a great business plan supported by a network of business
    1 point
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