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  1. 1 point
    Yes, agree with pretty much all that. I would tend not to be too dismissive of the value of learning the principles of coding. At my daughter's age, the concepts of IF/THEN constructs and all the other coding principles are all very new and worthwhile I think. And primarily at this stage, I think my aim is just to get her enthusiastic about learning, so the scratch level programs have been great and she still has some way to run with it. However, I take your point that she will pretty quickly run out of runway to learn with just coding which is why I am already thinking about what next. Your point about teachers asking what will you drop is very valid. They don't teach this stuff in normal school time for that very reason. However, as a parent I have oodles of after school time and holidays to fill which I would like to be as enriching as possible, hence my interest in this. I'm not actually particularly focused on coding or even STEM. However, I did attend a DATA 61 event where one of the keynote speakers was 9 years old and was a little blown away by the potential of young people to create a future using data. As you say, its what you do with the data rather than coding as a skill that will make the difference. However, I think understanding how to manipulate data via coding will be \ a modern day skill that should sit alongside other skills like literacy and mathematics. But how to develop it over time in a reasonable fashion? I put up a proposal in EA about a year ago to launch a STEM Outreach Community, whereby deliverers of STEM education services such as yourself could collaborate and learn from each other. It hasn't got traction yet but I remain hopeful. Cheers Tim
  2. 1 point
    with LORA at least, that is what you need to do. However the LORA technology is cheap enough to install transmitters. Also the coverage in the bush will be further
  3. 1 point
    until
    Recording: This event has now passed. The recording is available free for EA members on MyPortal. Navigate to Industry Specific Applications > Smart Cities Others may purchase the recording at EABooks. Title: How machine vision helps realise the Smart City concept Presenters: Ryan Messina, Director and Systems Engineer, Messina Vision Systems What you will learn: How to design for humans and why machines think differently. What role machine vision brings within larger networks. How uncertainty affects information systems. Developing information systems that grow and cope with tacit knowledge. Description: This presentation will discuss machine vision and unstructured data types in the use of IoT systems. These technologies unlock many new opportunities, some examples of these are generating traffic flow control and monitoring, feeding into an IoT system and how this information can benefit a Smart City. We will discuss methods to measure environmental conditions that can impact how systems operate in the tested conditions. Further, we will suggest methods of contingency planning using information to turn a human-operated task to semi-autonomous and could eventually be capable of being a completely autonomous system. About the presenter: For the past three years Ryan Messina has been the Director and Systems Engineer at Messina Vision Systems focused on delivering machine vision solutions for rugged environments, his experience covers many industries including surveillance, manufacturing, Defence, agriculture and infrastructure. Ryan has a bachelor of Engineering (Robotics and Mechatronics) from Swinburne University and uses machine vision to assist gather additional information. When: 12 midday AEST (Sydney) on 4 July 2017. The presentation will last 30 minutes followed by question time. Where: The presentation is by webinar. After registering you will be sent details of how to logon. Cost: This presentation is free to members of Engineers Australia (EA), the Australian Computer Society (ACS), the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) and IEEE. Just provide your membership number during registration for the event. The cost for non-members is $30. How to register: Please register on the Engineers Australia event system. Note, to register you need to have a free EA ID which you can get on the first screen of the registration page. Take note of your ID number for future events.
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