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  2. Frustrations in the IoT. It’s a day marked by high winds and even higher temperatures, with the ‘Fire Danger Index’ ratcheted over to ‘Catastrophic’ and 14 bushfires burning throughout South Australia. All this is perfect for testing worst-case conditions for an ugly problem that’s taken nearly two months to resolve; ‘noise’ in our CAT-M1 IoT loggers when making ac resistance measurements in soil moisture tension sensors called ‘gypsum blocks’, invented nearly eighty years ago. Frustratingly, the CAT-M1 network is down again; we later find that Telstra are installing a 5G network in the area and hence the intermittent LTE-M service. I’m having to bite my nails and trust in the data logging function to record the performance of this upgrade versus the faulty ‘control loggers’ mounted alongside it in the MEA Test Yard. ‘Noise’ to an irrigator looking at his soil moisture data means data bouncing about in some unseemly fashion that frustrates easy interpretation and that destroys confidence in the equipment. ‘Noise’ to an electronics engineer means electrical noise, and I’ve ploughed through endless measurements chasing elusive sources of spikes and other artefacts that can fool modern analog-to-digital converters. Fixes, patches, filters, firmware changes, more careful grounding – nothing makes any difference to the lousy data spewing forth. I’ve worked on this type of ac measurement through four-generations of gypsum block loggers. The problem is to generate a pure sinewave at the lowest possible cost. In this latest evolution, I’ve managed the sinewave generation, gypsum block excitation, gain block and full-wave rectification in a single quad op-amp. But it’s not working under field conditions… Finally, I push my test regime up beyond the 53° limit of our ancient environmental oven and the problem shows itself at 64°; it’s temperature-related, and being exacerbated in this new logger operating up to 70° thanks to its built-in solar panel. The digital circuitry doesn’t care, but the analog circuitry does. The sinewave collapses with temperature, and what looks like noise is actually a quantization error brought on by collapsing range, despite being held in check by proper ratiometric measurements against internal reference resistors. My fix of four extra resistors works in this worst of hot weather, and as a bonus I find that I can now run these sensors over tens of meters of cable; handy for odd deployments of gypsum blocks on particular farms. Sensor output is rock solid. Now MEA need only endure the product recall of the dozen units released to beta customers. Sure, I could have generated that sinewave with a digital-to-analog converter for $20, and I’ve done that in the past. But my 20-cent solution will serve the company better as we strive for a mass-market, riding on the coat-tails of the IoT wave. In the immortal words of Arthur M. Wellington “An engineer can do for a dollar what any fool can do for two.”
  3. Primitive upgrades in the IoT. If the first casualty of war is truth, then the first casualty of product launch is confidence. The harsh reality is that following product launch burgeoning deployments, the passage of time, the machinations of Mother Nature and the compounding of human errors will eventually throw up a bug; it’s a numbers game. Such bugs end the ‘jubilation phase’ of a successful product launch and call in the ‘humiliation phase’. In an ideal world there would be no in-field bugs causing customers and agents distress. Lengthy and private field trials over hundreds of farms in multiple crops right across the country would have shaken out all such gremlins. In the real world of practical IoT engineering, such a leisurely approach to perfection is denied the product development team. Commercial, budgetary and market imperatives intrude. The first customers become the beta testers. MEA’s CAT-M1 IoT data logger launched just in time ­ – in early September 2019 ­­– and our prototype stock of 100 units was sold out within three weeks. Now, that’s a great feeling! A long and sustained period of intensive product development effort was rewarded by first-to-market status and demand outstripping supply. As a consequence, the emphasis shifted immediately to boosting production to meet back-orders. In the meantime, data flowed to Green Brain from 80 sites, and down in the MEA basement those of us in the product development team waited anxiously to learn our fate. Had we out-witted Murphy’s Laws? Nope! Finally, after a lengthy silence from the modem manufacturer and increasingly strident demands in the engineering forums, the chip maker admitted to a firmware bug that’s been the chief cause of our lack of confidence; they acknowledged a combination of events that could lock out connection to the Internet through a failure to safely enter ultra-low power mode. Weeks after our product launch, they released a new firmware version purporting to have fixed the bug. Simultaneously, reports began to arrive back from the field showing product lock-up after weeks of perfect operation. Data just stopped flowing from a modest percentage of stations. AAaaHHhRRrr! More midnight oil, and we upgraded to the modem manufacturer’s latest firmware – incorporating the critical bug-fix – and we tightened up a few possible edge-cases while we were in there; anything to improve safety and fault recovery. Here’s where over-air programming (OAP) would have allowed us to seamlessly upgrade all deployed systems without leaving the office. That developmental luxury had been set aside under time-to-market pressures and slated for Version 2 release. Without that remote upgrade facility, our techs had to load up the company truck and head out into the vineyards and orchards of our irrigated agricultural districts to begin the laborious task of individually and directly upgrading those first deployed units (photo, below) The silver-lining in this debacle is that the engineering team now has a stronger case for developing an over-air programming facility in these new loggers, expensive though that development will be. A week has passed, the truck and its weary tech are back in Adelaide and every deployed CAT-M1 logger is back on the air and bullet-proofed as best we know how. New stock is due in next week and life will return to normal, whatever that is around here. MEA's open-air Green Brain Logger upgrade station somewhere in rural Victoria. Our reserve stock of 20 units – loaded with the latest firmware – is swapped into field sites and the older versions get to enjoy the sunshine on some local park bench while their heads are upgraded. Then another round begins, with the attraction of over-air upgrades rising by the kilometre.
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    About the speaker Steve Barker is the Owner and Director of Prospect Control Systems Pty Ltd. An accomplished and highly experienced industrial control systems engineer, Steve has taken forward Industrial IoT technology for a number of clients and sees IIoT as a natural extension and enhancement of traditional control system engineering. Steve is a Chartered Professional Engineer and Member of Engineers Australia. Webinar synopsis This webinar will focus on 2 case studies of the implementation of LPWan technology in an industrial context. The 2 projects that are the subject of the case studies used different LPWan technology - 1 LoraWAN and 1 SigFox, and the experiences in the delivery of these projects will be examined and discussed. The challenges faced and the longer term outcomes and benefits from the projects will be presented to give listeners a real world and practical perspective on these technologies in an industrial setting. Key Takeaways Listeners will gain an understanding of the implementation of LPWan in 2 industrial projects and take away knowledge as to how it may be applied in their industries or services. This webinar will be of interest to end users of the technology and also system engineers, suppliers and integrators.
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    Synopsis Matt Tett, chair IoT Alliance Australia (IoTAA) (www.iot.org.au) WSe3 - Cyber Security and Network Resilience will be presenting on the strategy that IoTAA has taken to address stakeholder concerns when it comes to ensuring IoT ecosystems can uphold security, safety and privacy. Key Takeaways: If your role involves IoT from a manufacture, development, supply or procurement perspective receive value in learning key, 1. Details of the IoT “TrustMark” Certification program, 2. Information about the IoT reference framework (architecture), 3. Resources for the IoT Security Awareness Guides, both supply side and demand side, 4. Current status of Industry and government working relationships. Register for the IoT Security in Australia: The current state of play webinar
  6. The IoT takes centre-stage at the World Electronics Forum (WEF) in Adelaide in early December 2019 The WEF is an annual meeting of Electronics Industry leaders from around the world. This is the first time since 2003 that the WEF has taken place in Australia and will be a major event for our industry, bringing together investors and CEOs from the world’s largest electronics companies. It is expected to create business links, collaboration and investment opportunities. LPWAN – Low Power Wide Area IoT Networks – is a central stream of the conference. This is your chance to hear from some of the key players in the Australian IoT scene: 1. Alex Grant of Myriota (satellite-connected IoT) 2. Adrian Tchordjallian of Thinxstra (Sigfox LPWAN) 3. Andrew Suttle of U-Blox (international IoT experience across many fields) 4. Andrew Skinner of MEA (AgTech IoT – long-range ZigBee, Bluetooth, 433 MHz LPWAN, 3G, CAT-M1, Myriota satellite) Exhibition spaces are available for electronic companies looking for a local venue displaying to an international audience. There are awards to be won for best product and young professional, plus others. How about being a speaker, selling Australian innovation to the world? See the web-site for details: - https://www.wef-adelaide.com Only seven (7) weeks to go – register now, apply for an award, exhibition space or a speaking slot.
  7. Hi Andrew Thanks for your message. We are currently working to resolve the issue. Regards Jackson Jones - Community of Practice Coordinator
  8. Hi Geoff Hoping this finds you well.. There are seven items of spam on two of our IoT Forum pages - looks like a failure of the EA Cyber Security system? Can you pull some strings and clean us up? Cheers for now Andrew at MEA
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    Adopters of Internet of Things technologies in Australia often have to make compromises when selecting commercial-off-the-shelf technologies to meet their needs. Australia has environmental, geographic and commercial realities that are different from those in Europe, the USA and Asia. These differences create opportunities for innovators to find niche opportunities to manufacture IoT devices that are optimised for use in Australia. This presentation provides a step-by-step guide for engineers in all industries on how to develop their own IoT device, covering business requirements, design for manufacture and building the case for manufacturing in Australia. A number of case studies are presented including the Senquip ORB-X1, a general-purpose IoT sensor gateway developed in Australia. About the presenter: Norman Ballard is the General manager of Engineering at BZG, a systems integrator focusing on marine systems, and CEO of Senquip, a manufacturer of IoT gateways for connecting sensors. Norman has extensive experience in electronics design. He founded Hummingbird Electronics in 1997 after emigrating from South Africa. Prior to this, he was a Project Engineer at General Electric, Director of the Semiconductor Division within Avnet and Market Development Manager for semiconductor products in Southern Africa for Motorola. Presentation slides IOT an Opportunity for Manufacturers in Australia.pdf
  10. Cash-flow in the IoT. Even for a mature company like MEA, the expensive business of IoT product development can be a scary process. It’s always a race against the clock, as one burns cash reserves against the promise of returns from early sales of new-to-market products. More companies go broke from cash-flow crises than anything else. Just a few weeks’ delay in product launch can invoke such a cash-flow crisis (unless you have extraordinarily-deep pockets). This is especially true in a seasonal business such as irrigated agriculture – late to market can be disastrous. What might well have sold a month ago must now wait a further eleven months to be of interest to customers. If – that is – some competitor hasn’t gained the upper-hand by then… However, when all that risk pays off, it’s a true delight. Cash flow turns positive and management breathes a sigh of relief. These last few weeks before product launch of MEA’s CAT-M1 on-farm IoT data logger have had all those elements of tension, suspense, crisis and fear. Last-minute software bugs, production issues, field trial feedback, creation of extra test jigs and finally, ramming product through the new production line – all these things added to the pressure. As Engineering Director, it’s my job at these times is to stay outwardly calm and cheerful, buffering an engineering staff beset by technical problems from marketing staff beset by an agent network clamouring for product delivery. Today – just a few weeks after product launch – we’re well on the way to selling out of our entire first production run of 100 units. Funds expended in their manufacture will now flow back into the company coffers. Now we face new challenges to our cash reserves; we have to swing into full production, investing in greater numbers of units while seasonal demand lasts and before the rapidly dwindling existing stock of these new loggers runs dry. Such is business. A brand-new MEA solar-powered CAT-M1 data logger for soil moisture monitoring, deployed in table grapes in the Victorian ‘Riverina’ region. Neatly installed at the foot of a wooden trellis post (in the foreground), the GBL-C logger is safe from farm machinery and foxes and hares that chew exposed cables.
  11. For the time we decided to offer our decisions to Maersk, trying to fill their blockchain with our navigation system. Also we have got some ideas in positioning and tracking the vessel without satellite in conditions of radio-electronic warfare.
  12. End Game in the IoT It’s been a long autumn and winter effort completing development of a CAT-M1-based on-farm data logger for release in the southern Spring, now only two days away. These product development sprints are a long litany of small crises that are surmounted and left behind in the rear-view mirror. When you’re stuck in the middle of it, it feels like crawling over broken glass. But we have early orders, some stock on the shelf with more next week, and rudimentary field trails conducted that have already thrown up a weird software bug in the ultra-low power state that this logger depends upon to keep energy consumption within budget. A software work-around nipped that in the bud before it got released into the wild. Our marketing department have been on the road, talking up the benefits of a completely new Internet-connected data logger that’s attractively priced and robustly packaged. This new product offering has been enthusiastically embraced by our key agents. Great technology is indistinguishable from magic. In this case, much of the excitement would appear to be generated by the simplest part of this technological wizardry: the coloured light behind our Green Brain symbol. This indicates CAT-M1 network connectivity, data transfers and GPS fixes to the guys with the muddy boots working under primitive conditions out in the field. This is MEA’s third IoT development in eighteen months, with two more key projects beginning as soon as this new technology is properly bedded down. I’ll lead the product development team through the coming Spring and Summer, until my 67th birthday next March. So, the real end-game in this IoT race is actually to invest the next generation of MEA engineers with the spirit of the sprint, a ‘can-do’ ethos and the sense that with hard work, anything is possible.
  13. Interesting development in the UK. UK IoT Cyber security Measures.pdf
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    The manufacture of quality electronic products requires a capable manufacturer with a robust quality management system, supported by sound engineering of designs with a strong “design for manufacture” focus. This webinar explores how Australian companies can cost-effectively design and manufacture their next generation of products in Australia. We begin by describing the key elements of the electronics manufacturing process, from sourcing parts to boxed product assembly. We then explore design for manufacture principles and show how they align with these production processes. Surprisingly, the cost of electronics manufacturing in Australia can approach price parity with Asian countries. This untold success story runs counter to the common perception that all electronics manufacturing in Australia is dead. However, particularly in demanding mission or safety-critical industries like medical, defence, aerospace and mining, Australian manufacturers have held their own. Now they are turning the tables as a relentless focus on quality-driven continual improvement has improved unit costs to within 80% to 90% of Asian manufacturers. When combined with other service, reliability and security factors, and contrasted with the logistical challenges of dealing with outsourcing partners, the value proposition for keeping manufacturing wholly in Australia is growing more compelling by the day. About the presenters: Serena Ross is the general manager at Circuitwise, a contract electronics manufacturer and turnkey product assembly. Geoff sizer is the CEO of Genesys Electronics Design, an electronics design firm specialising in the development of smart electronic devices leveraging Internet of Things technologies. Takeaways: Understand design for manufacture in electronics Be familiar with the end-to-end electronics manufacturing process Learn how to brief both designers and manufacturers for best outcomes Webinar slides - Design for manufacture.pdf
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    By Ollencio D'Souza The presentation provides the listener an overview of the "visual analysis technology" from the standpoint of it being used as a sensory augmentation tool to improve many facets of human living experiences and will focus on a key aspect connected with security and safety of humankind. The presentation will also go through what a business process is and how video analytic tools enable us to create "scenario" detection, which allows many industries to tailor the level of augmentation to meet their automation objectives. The presentation uses images and animations to present what the IEC62676-6 VCA System performance testing and grading, emerging standard, has proposed. Ollencio D'Souza is a Director, TechnologyCare, since January 2010 focusing on converged IP system project design, implementation, project management and maintenance. He is a member of the Standards committees and associations, and IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers). He has also presented several papers at ASIAL Conferences, Security 2000 Conferences and other local and international events, “Watermarking of Video” at the IEEE International Carnahan Conference on Security Technology, Virtual Presence at the “Remote Monitoring” IDC Conference in Perth, August 10th -12th. He is a regular contributor to industry magazines, forums and events, several articles written by me have been published in Security Australia, Security Electronics, CCTV Today, CCTV Focus and other national and international publications, and has participated in three Patent applications with UTCFS and UTRC staff. Slides Webinar6thAugust19.pdf
  16. Photo: MEA CAT-M1 Data Logger MEA’s CAT-M1 enabled data logger in functional prototype form (exploded view): Left: Clear lid. Centre: PCB, including Li-Ion battery, CAT-M1 modem (modem chip not installed), SIM-card and SD memory card holder (cards not installed) and PCB dual antenna. Most of the electronic circuity is on the rear of the PCB. The blue PCB is the plug-in sensor daughter-board. Right: Wedge-shaped solar panel custom-built to fit inside the tapered enclosure and attached to the black polycarbonate inlay. Cable assemblies are not shown.
  17. In our longest blog story yet, MEA describes the market forces that pushed us towards the latest CAT-M1 logging technology for use in the Australian bush, and how we engineered this new product to shoe-horn it into a small low-cost enclosure. All this, while adding a custom-made on-board solar panel, a dual PCB aerial for CAT-M1 and GPS, high efficiency battery charging, smarter connectivity, pluggable sensor interfaces and a Linux-based open-source operating system. Phew! This latest yarn can be found on this forum under ‘IoT Engineering/ What does it take to be an IoT engineer?/ CAT-M1 replaces 3G in MEA’s IoT’ at the bottom of Page 3.
  18. CAT-M1 replaces 3G in MEA’s IoT. The death knell of 3G logging systems – the backbone technology of many thousands of MEA monitoring systems ­in agriculture, climate and renewable energy systems across regional Australia for the past decade or more – will soon be ringing. As Telcos try to meet consumer demand for streaming videos and cloud-based services, getting customers off 3G allows carriers to free up wireless frequencies for 4G signals (the ‘long-term evolution’ or ‘LTE’ standard) over broader swaths of the radio spectrum. That trend towards more cellular bandwidth is of no interest to MEA; ours is a slow and patient drip-feeding of data from ground-based sensors up to our Green Brain platform, now holding somewhere north of 1.3 billion data records and rising at the rate of over a million records a day from more than 4000 sites. All is not lost, however – the telcos are climbing onto the IoT bandwagon by providing CAT-M1 and NB-IoT options on their LTE networks for those of us in the slow lane. MEA chooses CAT-M1, because we can buy that technology now (whereas NB-IoT is still not commercially available in Australia). We get a 2.6 times boost in transmission distance in comparison to 3G loggers, a lowering of our power consumption and – best of all – free IoT gateways all over the country! No more on-farm hubs to build and deploy – we jump from the sensor site direct to those tall cell towers. Down in the MEA basement the product development team has shrunk from four to three with the departure of our mechanical engineer for the warmth of Kununurra in Western Australia. Once again, product development timelines for a CAT-M1 product to replace MEA’s 3G loggers is predicated upon the opening of the irrigation season in July, leaving us 16 weeks to go from a clean sheet of paper to product on the shelf. Well, perhaps not quite a blank slate… To meet a four-month development cycle for an IoT product requires deep pockets full of all sorts of technological wizardry and understandings. These have been developed laboriously over the 35 years since MEA itself was a start-up, and I was its sole employee. The new logger operating system – for example – is Linux-based and uses the Legato operating system. We spent over a year figuring out this new platform to upgrade the 3G Hub of our Plexus on-farm sensor networks. Both hardware and firmware were debugged back then, and now we are simply recycling that IP in a new form. Software libraries were also developed back then to handle secure data uploads to Green Brain, data storage into lifetime memory on an 8 GB SD card and all the peripheral logic and switching to achieve ultra-low power mode. Likewise our solar-battery systems; the art of maximum power-point tracking (MPPT) and constant-current/constant voltage (CC/CV) charging of Lithium-Ion batteries from small solar panels was perfected in other projects over the past two years. Despite that head-start we’ve had some serious rabbits to pull out of the hat for this product to be commercially competitive. Fundamentally, the price of the enclosure and connectivity was predicted to have the greatest impact on the cost of the final product. To get around this, we needed to be able to use our smallest and least expensive enclosure. We already have the tooling for this robust and fully field-tested housing, through our GDot product. We’d learnt to ‘build it out’ during our Bluetooth IoT product developments in 2018. However, this small fully-sealed enclosure brought its own problems; somehow we had to shoe-horn a CAT-M1 aerial and a GPS antenna into there. We solved this with a tiny dual PCB antenna system that required special rf modelling to get the matching networks and micro-strip lines on the PCB to operate at our specified frequencies. Similarly, the solar panel had now got to be inside that small low-cost enclosure with everything else, behind the clear polycarbonate enclosure top. We solved that one by tooling up in China for a custom 960 mW 5.5 V solar panel with a cute rhomboidal shape designed for a perfect fit, but also over-sized to allow for efficiency losses imposed by the use of a vertical solar panel. There was also no room for an ‘on-off switch’; plugging and unplugging sensors has to start and stop logging and prevent power consumption during shelving and shipment. That design spec alone stalled us for some two weeks of serious head-scratching. Similarly, grumbling from our marketing department had us searching for a smaller circular connector to fit inside conduit used to protect cabling against rabbits, parrots and farm machinery. We found such a connector out of China, but at a prohibitive assembly cost if we soldered it on to multi-cored cables here in Australia. So we moved cable assembly to China as well, driving costs down by 66%. Sensor interfacing had to be plug-and-play. Fortunately, MEA developed pluggable daughter-boards during last year’s Bluetooth project. These were designed to work across multiple IoT platforms so they clip easily into this CAT-M1 logger. This gives us SDI-12 connectivity and the ability to make AC resistance measurements of thermistor temperature sensors and gypsum blocks. Two more sensor daughter-boards pop out of the works; one for all sorts of dumb analog and digital sensors and another for ultrasonic level measurement to be used in tank-level monitoring, cattle movements or whatever. These have been set aside for later in the year – we’ve no resources left to complete the firmware for these last two plug-ins. By week 12 we have working prototypes, CAT-M1 connectivity, GPS reception and functional logging in the MEA Test Yard. Its deepest winter here in Adelaide and the shadows of the tall buildings surrounding us in this industrial estate limit the hours of available solar charging to five hours each day before shadows encroach. Battery voltage climbs under load, and we all breathe a sigh of relief. On top of the CAT-M1 logger design is the parallel development of the test jigs and software needed on the production line. This stutters forward slowly as we divert resources to gain EMC compliance on our Bluetooth IoT products (so we can fill an order from the largest dairy in Europe – in Turkey) and sort out issues with the Green Brain mobile ‘Retrieve’ app to cater for the latest Android and iPhone models. But functional doesn’t mean finished. Serious software development effort is still required to cater for ‘edge cases’ under field conditions, to link us more closely with Green Brain to automate the installation process and to implement over-air upgrades. But we are in production, and there’s a very good chance we’ll go to market with a highly competitive CAT-M1 logger that will rejuvenate MEA systems in the market once our trusty work-horse 3G systems are put out to pasture in the next year or two. Photos will follow – just as soon as I find that spare minute I’ve been looking for all year…
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    Description: Advanced Pipe Sensing for Leaks and Breaks By: Dr Don McCallum NSW Smart Sensing Network Spanning fundamental discovery science to real time application on live water networks, this multi million dollar venture will use five different strands of smart sensing research for condition assessment and leak detection to prevent catastrophic breaks in what is a multi-billion dollar global problem. The program involves real sensors in a city-wide network, putting this work at the physical end of the IoT and Smart Cities developments. This collaboration draws upon the expertise of several leading research universities and water utilities under the co-ordination of the NSW Smart Sensing Network. Presentation slides.pptx
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    I have registered for this event. I wonder how can I attend this webinar event. Am I supposed to receive any link to follow?
  21. A Two-Legged Race in the IoT Twelve weeks after pivoting back from the Myriota transmission trials to start the development of MEA’s CAT-M1 logger, I sign the purchase orders and we’re in production of the first 100 units. That story must wait for another day. In the meantime, our three Myriota loggers rack up their first three months of continuous unattended operation. Rainfall has boosted the moisture in the top 60 cm of the soil profile and lifted the level in the rainwater tanks, while the first frosts have occurred and been captured. The panel of three photos shows my Green Brain view of these three satellite-delivered systems on my smart phone, which I open at odd moments to ease my nerves. Perhaps the real test has been that I no longer hang about anxiously twice-daily, waiting for the latest satellite pass. I get on with other things. In the race to develop these two new IoT technologies to meet the demands of the looming Australian irrigation season, it is the satellite-based Myriota field stations that are clocking up the data-hours. But it will be MEA’s terrestrial CAT-M1 loggers – with a mere two weeks of logged data to their credit – that will do the heavy lifting.
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    By Tim Cara GeoWAN was founded to fill the dedicated LoRaWAN network role for Australia as IoT is moving fast and becoming more accessible the role of a ecosystem is becoming more important.LoRaWAN is a standard aimed at interoperability that requires device makers, solution providers and networks to work together.With the arrival of easy of access technologies and more flexible business delivery methods how IoT will open greater opportunities to Australian businesses and their future. Tim Cara who is a lifelong business owner and co-founder of GeoWAN and is trying to get the internet of things working for everyone’s benefit. Tim began working with Excel Electrical Engineers (EEE) in 2015 as a business strategy advisor and business development manager. First stumbled upon IoT in late 2015 and began directing a change in business direction. GeoWAN was founded in 2016 to focus on telecommunications and EEE shifted away from electronic design. Since then he has been working on delivering Australia’s dedicated LoRaWAN network in the testing, compliance, certification, deployment and regulatory aspects. Currently GeoWAN has networks in every state and territory, except Canberra, with multiple applications reliant on the network for data carriage. Tim envisioned delivering IoT connectivity services that are Reliable, Bi-directional, Affordable, Secure, Scalable and 100% user owned data.
  23. Pivoting in the IoT Harsh competitive realities find MEA’s 4G-connected Plexus networks competing with older 3G technology in IoT on-farm applications. This, even though the 3G network has entered its Sunset Phase and disruptions to this network are expected to increase over the coming year as Telstra and other carriers reclaim these frequencies for 4G/LTE services. Telstra have announced 3G closures from 2020, now only a year away. Although MEA also has these older 3G offerings, it’s been clear that they will need to be replaced as soon as possible by newer LTE/CAT-M1 offerings, if only we could actually buy such technology to design into products. What these 3G offerings have shown us is that ‘sensor to tower’ terrestrial IoT technologies offer the real cost advantage of ‘no gateway’. Yet the hype swirling around our heads is promoting diametrically opposite solutions; a return to one-way sensor-to-gateway solutions of the sort that we built and deployed twenty years ago. Sure, Sigfox and LoRaWAN offer much improved radio technologies compared to our older 433 MHz simplex products. But the main bugbear from back-in-the-day remains: if you can’t make the jump from the sensor site to some local gateway, you can’t make the measurement, so you can’t make the sale. The problem then was always barriers - topography, tank farms, wood lots, distance, weak allowable radio power, wet canopies, ground-effects and the sheer clutter of other radio traffic on these free-to-air bands. MEA’s Plexus networks solved that problem in 2013 by forming co-operative sensor mesh networks to work around such barriers. Data back-haul from the single Plexus hub operated on both 3G and 4G bands. 3G/4G technologies could always beat that ‘barriers’ rap by shouting louder on quieter channels; the telcos – after all – own and control those portions of the radio-frequency spectrum. CAT-M1 will do even better, with a gain in transmission distance of over 2.5 times compared to 3G/4G modems. Myriota’s satellite solution offers the only other viable alternative; transmit upwards instead of sideways. The ‘gateway’ passes overhead everywhere a number of times a day. A year ago – with that background – MEA made the choice to work on CAT-M1 and Myriota IoT technologies for our newer offerings. MEA's CAT-M1 product development began late in 2018 while we waited for news on the availability of Myriota technology, which turned up in January of 2019. A quick pivot into Myriota territory saw MEA build three operational Myriota links in February; these have been transmitting soil moisture, micro-climate and tank level data solidly to MEA's Green Brain since then. That done, by March those harsh competitive realities saw us pivot quickly back to the CAT-M1 developments to help us face rising threats in our traditional irrigated agriculture markets. These new CAT-M1 Green Brain Loggers are to be released in the third-quarter of 2019 to replace our ageing 3G technology. In the meantime, we keep a close eye on our Myriota traffic, learning much of value about how we need to build that product after our CAT-M1 launch in a few months’ time.
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    Description: 2019 Headline activities and plans for IoT Alliance By: Geof Heydon Internet of Things (IoT) Alliance Australia Principal Consultant Smart Cities and Data Sharing Consultant As the IoT Alliance Australia (IoTAA) Principal Consultant and co-founder, Geof will put the Internet of Things (IoT) into context and discuss the ecosystem complexity of IoT. He will share the IoTAA approach, structure, activities and publications and introduce the challenges faced with data sharing which underpins all IoT initiatives. Examples of smart city and local government will be used to illustrate the issues. He will introduce the “five Safes” approach to data sharing and discuss the emerging standards for trust preserving data sharing. As a digital technology consultant, Geof co-founded the IOT Alliance, Australia - IoTAA in 2015 and today is their principal consultant and Chair of the Platforms and Interoperability Workstream. Geof is currently working in Smart City initiatives and developing Digital Strategy, Data Sharing Policy and risk analysis for local Governments. He also Chairs the Australian Computer Society’s (ACS’s) Data Sharing Technical Committee and sits on the ACS Technical Board and chairs the Standards Australia JTC1 IoT working group mirror committee. Extensive practical executive management, innovation and consulting experience in Telecommunications, Science and the emerging digital economy, Smart Cities and Internet of Things. Experience driving and transitioning science and ideas though innovation into the market. 2019-25-06 2019 Headline of Activities for IoT Alliance Australia.pdf
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    By Brian Dorricott When we are in deep, working with amazing technology such as IoT in its many forms, we are busy solving customer problems. We are used to speaking in the language of the solution and the vision of the future, but does that resonate with the customer? What is the problem that the customer is trying to solve right now? And how much will they pay to have it solved? How do you find out without giving away your idea or becoming a “sales man”? This webinar will explore the answers to these questions. Brian Dorricott has taken 88 teams through Australia’s national science and technology accelerator run by CSIRO. He leverages his first-hand experience as an engineer, serial founder, and entrepreneur having founded two companies: Gordano in 1994 (exit to MBO, 217x RoI) which provided messaging software that was used by 13,200 companies including the US Army, IBM and Telstra; and an internet security company (sold to Cisco, 50x RoI). He left his role as the Entrepreneur in Residence at SETSquared (the world’s leading university incubator) to facilitate and lead individuals and teams through the process of maximising the impact of their innovation for themselves and Australia. 2019-11-06 Innovation with IoT.pdf
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    By Prof Jinho Choi In this talk, we present an overview of cellular IoT that provides infrastructure-based connectivity for IoT applications. In addition, some key features of 5G in relation to IoT applications are explained. In particular, we focus on machine-type communication (MTC) in LTE-A and 5G, which support massive connectivity for IoT devices and sensors and provide new approaches for MTC. We also briefly address IoT security issues and data-aided sensing. Jinho Choi was born in Seoul, Korea. He received B.E. (magna cum laude) degree in elec- tronics engineering in 1989 from Sogang University, Seoul, and M.S.E. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from Korea Advanced Institute of Sci- ence and Technology (KAIST) in 1991 and 1994, respectively. He is with the School of Information Technology, Burwood, Deakin University, Australia, as a Professor. Prior to joining Deakin in 2018, he was with Swansea University, United Kingdom, as a Professor/Chair in Wireless, and Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), Korea, as a Professor. His research interests include the Internet of Things (IoT), wireless communications, and statistical signal processing. He authored two books published by Cambridge University Press in 2006 and 2010. Prof. Choi received the 1999 Best Paper Award for Signal Processing from EURASIP, 2009 Best Paper Award from WPMC (Conference), and is Senior Member of IEEE. Currently, he is an Editor of IEEE Trans. Communications and IEEE Wireless Communications Letters and a Division Editor of Journal of Communications and Networks (JCN). We also had served as an Associate Editor or Editor of other journals including IEEE Communications Letters, JCN, IEEE Trans. Vehicular Technology, and ETRI journal. https://vimeo.com/engaustralia/review/339484054/8fbedd167a 2019-28-05 Cellular_IoT PDF.pdf
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